MTPR

Montana News

Montana Capitol dome, Helena.
William Marcus / Montana Public Radio

State Budget Clears First Hurdle With No Democratic Votes

A $10.3 billion state budget cleared an initial vote in the Montana House of Representatives this afternoon, without any support from Democrats. When state lawmakers walked into the legislative session earlier this year they were in the unusual situation of having watched the last state budget, passed in 2017, collapse .

Read More
Microphone and tablet.
(PD)

Survey: Help Us Improve Your Online Experience

How can we improve your online experience? Take a 5 minute survey about how you tune in, why you tune in, and what you want more or less of. Your feedback will help us understand your needs and guide our online efforts. Take the survey here to make your voice heard.

Read More

Get Montana News In Your Inbox

Sign up for our weekly email newsletter

Featured Arts & Music

Flickr user, Ingrid Taylar (CC-BY-2.0)

The Quiet Giant With A Raucous Rookery: A Great Blue Heron's Double Life

I’m not sure if I’ve ever been on a river, at any time of year, and not seen a Great Blue Heron . They seem to stand as solitary sentries on the rivers of Montana, but also on rivers from Canada to South America.

Read More

MTPR Schedule

Montana Public Radio Schedule

See what's coming up on MTPR

Richest Hill

'Richest Hill': Available now!

A podcast about the past, present and future of one of America's most notorious Superfund sites

Help Us Improve Your Online Experience

Take a 5 minute survey to tell us how you use MTPR online and what changes you'd like to see

Go
Senator Jon Tester.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Nationwide, military veterans commit suicide at the rate of 17 a day, and despite many efforts to bring it down, the rate has remained constant for years.

On Wednesday, Montana Sen. Jon Tester has introduced a bill aimed at making an impact, by containing numerous directives for the U.S. Veterans Administration.

Downtown Whitefish, MT.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

Kate Berry says owning a house in Whitefish felt like a pipedream five years ago.

"We had searched for almost a year I guess, and everything that was in our price point was still out of our price point."

Berry pieced together a livable wage working full time for a nonprofit and waitressing at night. Her partner tended bar and rapped for a popular local band. But even together they couldn’t quite pull in enough for a down payment. Rentals kept falling through, and for a while, she says she wasn’t sure how her family could live and work in the town she grew up in.

Colstrip power plant, Colstrip Montana.
Flicker User ambib (CC-BY-NC)

A plan to allow the state’s largest electric utility to buy a bigger share of the coal-fired power plant in Colstrip is taking a new form. The so-called Montana Energy Security Act of 2019 was introduced Wednesday in the state Legislature.

Hours after senators voted to table a prior proposal to allow NorthWestern Energy to buy more of Colstrip and pass along certain costs to their customers for up to 30 years, a similar idea landed in the hopper.

Montana Capitol.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio

UPDATE: House Appropriations voted 17 to five to pass the bill out of committee following its first hearing. 

Gov. Steve Bullock says a Republican-sponsored infrastructure bill could break through what he calls a “log jam” that’s prevented other major public works proposals from passing in the state Legislature.

The so-called State and Local Infrastructure Act got its first hearing in House Appropriations, Wednesday.

Temperatures will be slowly increasing in the Northern Rockies, starting this Friday and lasting through the first half of next week, with highs reaching the upper 40s to low 50s across much of north central Idaho and western Montana. March 13, 2019.
NWS Missoula

While a blizzard slammed parts of southeast Montana Wednesday, it seems winter weather is finally giving way to spring-like conditions west of the divide.

National Weather Service Missoula says spring runoff season is just about to start in earnest. 

Some Montana Cellphone Users Can't Connect To 911

Mar 13, 2019
Cell phone.
(PD)

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Some cellphone users in parts of Montana have been having problems making emergency calls.

The disruption for Verizon Wireless customers dialing 911 has been reported in Billings and Bozeman.

Thank You Flathead Valley Listeners!

Mar 13, 2019
Thanks to everyone who joined us in Kalispell for the listener meet-up on March 7.
Anne Hosler / Montana Public Radio

Thanks to all the Flathead Valley listeners who joined us in Kalispell Thursday. It was a pleasure to meet you all and to hear your feedback. It was also a great send-off for Flathead Reporter Nicky Ouellet.

We couldn't imagine a friendlier group! Many of you told us how much you rely on MTPR's news and music programs. We especially appreciate your words of support and encouragement. Thank you again. This is your public radio station, and your feedback helps make it work even better for you.

Rep. Ed Buttrey (R) - Great Falls
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

Republicans’ long-awaited proposal to modify and continue Montana’s Medicaid expansion program was introduced Tuesday in the state Legislature.

Rep. Ed Buttrey’s bill would make permanent the state’s health coverage program for low-income adults — along with making some major changes.

Montana Senate Endorses Moving Oversight Of Youth Programs

Mar 12, 2019
Montana State Capitol.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The Montana Senate has endorsed a bill to give the state health department oversight of private residential programs for troubled children.

Tuesday's 34-15 vote comes after a series by the Missoulian that found multiple problems with programs for children dealing with emotional and behavioral problems.

Funding For Missing Persons Bill Remains In Limbo

Mar 12, 2019
A sign from a Jan. 9, 2019 missing and murdered Indigenous women vigil in Missoula.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

Montana lawmakers are no closer to agreeing on who should fund a missing persons bill after a hearing Tuesday in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

House Bill-21, or “Hanna’s Act” is named for a Northern Cheyenne woman who was murdered in 2013. The bill would create a position in the Montana Department of Justice to investigate every missing persons case across the state, in an attempt to bridge gaps in communication and jurisdiction between state, tribal and federal agencies.

Pages