MTPR

Aaron Bolton

Flathead Reporter

Aaron is Montana Public Radio's Flathead reporter. He joined us in 2019 from Alaska where he reported on commercial fisheries and rural issues. 

Ranch For Kids' main facility in the small, remote town of Rexford, MT.
Aaron Bolton / Montana Public Radio

It’s been nearly two months since Montana health officials removed 27 children from the Ranch for Kids in Rexford due to allegations of physical and emotional abuse. Ranch for Kids’ license is still suspended, and according to the ranch’s director, a hearing to appeal that decision has not been held.

A boat at the Flathead Lake Biological Station.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

A viral Facebook post is spreading false information about a toxic blue-green algae bloom in Flathead Lake, according to lake researchers. The post claims that a dog died after swimming in the lake, but the Flathead Lake Biological Research Station says there’s no evidence to support the claim.

The Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services held a hearing Thursday on new rules for private residential youth programs. While there was support for the regulations, some of the programs that would fall under the proposed rules said they went too far. 

Grizzly bear family. Stock photo.
iStock

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks euthanized the mother of three grizzly bear cubs Tuesday in the Seeley-Swan Valley after she became food conditioned. 14 grizzlies from the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE) have been euthanized this year, double the 10-year average.

About two years ago, a Saskatchewan woman found an odd rock on her farm. It was recently determined to be a fossil known as a "buffalo stone," which is sacred to the Blackfeet people. The rare find may provide further proof of the tribe’s historic range.

Westslope cutthroat trout.
Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

For the first time, Glacier National Park is attempting to eradicate non-native trout species and restore native westslope cutthroat trout. The project on the west side of the park specifically aims to preserve genetically pure westslope populations.

The weeping wall on Glacier Park's Going-to-the-Sun Road.
David Restivo, NPS (PD)

This upcoming weekend could be one of the last to venture to the top of Glacier National Park’s Going-to-the-Sun Road from the western park entrance. The western alpine section of the road will close for two weeks starting Sept. 16.

Fire Management Officer Keith Van Broke oversees the start of a 2017 prescribed burn to clear dry, dead brush from an area logged three years previous.
Nicky Ouellet / Montana Public Radio

After a tame fire season, the Flathead National Forest hopes to spark a number of prescribed burns in the coming weeks, but rain could limit how much work fire managers get done.

White-tailed deer.
(PD)

It’s been two years since Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) was detected in Montana’s deer herds, and in May the disease popped up in the northwest corner of the state in Libby. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) has a plan to manage the fatal disease based on its prevalence, a strategy born from more than 20 years of trial and error across the country.

Road crew worker installs guard rail on the iconic Going to the Sun Road in Glacier National Park, MT.
Nicky Ouellet

Glacier National Park’s new proposed management for Going to the Sun Road calls for increased shuttle bus service, bike access and a new 100-car parking lot. The plan was released Friday and its sole focus is reducing congestion as park visitation grows.

Pages