Montana Public Radio

Aaron Bolton

Flathead Reporter

Aaron is Montana Public Radio's Flathead reporter. He joined us in 2019 from Alaska where he reported on commercial fisheries and rural issues. 

An informational sign at the entrance of the National Bison Range near Moiese, MT.
Josh Burnham

The U.S. Interior Department Friday signed an order that will start the transfer of the National Bison Range to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes.

A stack of logs.
(PD)

291,000 acres of private timberlands in northwest Montana have a new owner. Washington state-based Green Diamond closed the deal with Southern Pine Plantations this week.

Labels on the back of CSKT servers name the locations of four cellular towers on that are broadcasting high-speed internet over roughly 1,300 square miles on the Flathead Indian Reservation.
Aaron Bolton / Montana Public Radio

The build-out of wireless broadband networks in Indian Country may get a boost from a new $1 billion tribal broadband fund. The federal fund was set up by the latest COVID relief bill late last year.

An image of someone receiving a vaccination pulled from the CDC site on 01.12.21.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Montana’s frontline health care workers are receiving their second doses of COVID-19 vaccines, guaranteeing fewer will become infected with the virus. But hospitals are not changing quarantine policies for vaccinated workers exposed to COVID-19, meaning staffing capacity will likely continue to be an issue in hospitals across the state.

U.S. Capitol
iStock

Following last week’s insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by pro-Trump extremists, there have been unsubstantiated claims that those who stormed the building were anti-fascist groups.

Montana’s junior U.S. Senator said Tuesday there’s no evidence those groups took part in the mob. 

Courtesy

On Wednesday, pro-Trump extremists stormed the U.S. Capitol in Washington D.C., breaking down doors and forcing their way into both the Senate and House chambers. MTPR’s Aaron Bolton spoke with Montana’s Democratic Sen. Jon Tester about what he calls an attempted coup.

A gloved hand swabs a person's arm, prepping it for a shot.
iStock

Jess Sheldahl: For YPR News, I'm Jess Sheldahl. Details about who will next receive the covid-19 vaccine in Montana and when are emerging, nearly 17,000 health care personnel in the state have received the first dose of the vaccine so far. Here to share what we know and still don't know about the rollout are Montana Public Radio's Aaron Bolton and Yellowstone Public Radio News’ is Nicky Ouellet Nicky Ouellet.

 

  


David Wiley (CC-BY-2)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes Tuesday officially ratified a water rights compact with the state and federal government. This begins the process of implementing the $1.9 billion settlement.

 

 


Lockers in an empty school hallway.
PD

The COVID relief bill passed by Congress Monday outlines more funding for Montana’s K-12 public school districts. State education officials say this round could be nearly four times larger than what districts received this summer.

 

 


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