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Miss Crow Nation Says Goodbye To Throne

Miss Crow Nation Says Goodbye To Throne As the Crow Nation steps into its new year following Crow Fair, one woman says goodbye to her throne. Olivia Reingold spent a day with Miss Crow Nation on one of the last days of her tenure.

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New Program Lineup Coming In September!

Starting September 2, you’ll hear an expanded lineup of engaging programs on Montana Public Radio. MTPR staff will be on the road to meet you on the MTPR Summer Brew Tour, August 12-22. Come chat and have a beer with us and listen to a preview reel introducing four new programs coming to the MTPR schedule.

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Featured Arts & Music

Looking Back On 'Bitches Brew': The Year Miles Davis Plugged Jazz In

Fifty years ago this August, Miles Davis assembled a group of musicians to record the sprawling, groundbreaking album Bitches Brew . With the sounds of Jimi Hendrix, Sly & the Family Stone and James Brown in his head, Davis plugged in and brought these electric rock sensibilities to jazz. Jazz Night in America host Christian McBride says the album's enigmatic sound was a departure for Davis — one that has rippled throughout music ever since. "It's not really rock, it's not really funk, it's...

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“Eager" is the powerful story of how nature’s most ingenious architects shaped our world, and how they can help save it—if we let them. Ben Goldfarb’s captivating book reveals how beavers transformed our landscapes, and how modern-day “Beaver Believers”—including scientists, ranchers, and passionate citizens—are recruiting these ecosystem engineers to help us fight our most pressing environmental problems. The Washington Post calls it, “A masterpiece of a treatise on the natural world” and The Boston Globe calls it, “The best sort of environmental journalism.”

Tom Beetz (CC-BY-2.0)

Pat Martino had been playing jazz guitar professionally for 19 years in 1980 when a severe brain aneurysm sent him into life-saving surgery - and then into life-altering amnesia. He barely recognized his own parents, let alone his guitar, and felt as if he had been "dropped cold, empty, neutral, cleansed ... naked." Martino's long journey back from that musical erasure began with his father playing back his own recordings for him. Slowly, he taught himself how to play again. By the early '90s, Martino had returned to the soul-jazz, post-bop and jazz-rock fusion scene.

Two new wildfires were reported in today, one near Wolf Creek and the other near Twin Bridges.

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(PD)

The inaugural Jeremy Bullock Safe Schools Summit held in Butte this week brought around 150 teachers, school administrators, law enforcement and mental health workers together to talk through the growing concern about violence in schools. The summit is named after Jeremy Bullock, an 11-year-old boy shot and killed on a school playground in Butte 25 years ago.

Montana Public Radio's Corin Cates-Carney spoke with Jeremy's parents Robin and Bill Bullock during the convention this week.

As the Crow Nation steps into its new year following Crow Fair, one woman says goodbye to her throne. Olivia Reingold spent a day with Miss Crow Nation on one of the last days of her tenure.

It's a windy, hazy summer morning on the Snake River plain in southeastern Idaho, and Shoshone-Bannock tribal member Trevor Beasley is hanging out near his horse trailer. It's about an hour before the Fort Hall Reservation Indian Relay races begin, and he's watching as a teammate gets a little too close to his favorite mare.

"Got to watch out for her, she's a kicker," Beasley says as his teammate jumps out of the way. "That's your warning right there, man."

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

With their hopes fading that lawmakers in Washington will pass new gun safety measures, young activists from March for Our Lives have their own plans on how to stem gun violence.

When curbside recycling caught on in the 1970s, it was mostly about cans, glass, cardboard and paper. That's how Donald Sanderson remembers it.

Sanderson is 90 years old, an earnest man with a ready smile. Every Thursday in Woodbury, N.J., where he lives, he hauls a big blue recycling bin out to the curb. Recycling is close to his heart. "I guess you could say I'm the father of recycling," he says. "I don't know if that's good or bad."

Screen capture, Montana Heritage Center project website, August 20, 2019.
The Montana Heritage Center / Montana Department of Administration

Two committees have been appointed for the building of a new Montana Heritage Center.

Department of Administration Director John Lewis appointed 12 Montanans for their backgrounds, experience and affiliations with Helena to analyze the best location and design for the new center. 

Bill Bullock stands on a stage at a Butte convention center, August 20, 2019 during the first Jeremy Bullock Safe School Summit. Jeremy, Bill's son, was shot and killed on the playground of Margaret Leary Elementary, in Butte, in the spring of 1999.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

Twenty-five years ago, 11-year-old Jeremy Bullock was shot by a classmate on the playground of Butte’s Margaret Leary Elementary. It was reportedly the youngest school shooting death in U.S. history at the time. 

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