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Power plant at Colstrip, MT.
Beth Saboe / MontanaPBS

Bill To Reduce Oversight Of Some Colstrip Costs Advances In Montana Senate

A rewritten Republican plan aimed at protecting the future of the coal-fired power plant in Colstrip is moving forward. But concerns remain about its potential impact on Montanans’ electric bills. When the so-called Montana Energy Security Act of 2019 was first introduced it drew comparisons to the deregulation of the Montana Power Company in the late 1990s, which skyrocketed electric bills across the state.

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Montana Attorney General Tim Fox.
Courtesy Montana DOJ

The man killed this week in a fiery, wrong-way crash on Interstate-90 near Missoula was a friend and law school classmate of Montana Attorney General Tim Fox.

Fox describes Martin Elison as, "A wonderful individual. An incredible guy."

Rep. Ed Buttrey (R) - Great Falls
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

The Republican plan to continue Medicaid expansion will result in half of the 96,000 people currently enrolled in the program losing health coverage. That’s according to an analysis released this afternoon by Governor Steve Bullock’s office.

Tonight on Capitol Talk: The state's utility regulators endorse a bill that appears to weaken the their own regulatory oversight. The cost of Medicaid expansion — and a new revenue estimate — complicate the state budget outlook. The president of the Senate wants to be the top election official. And the mayor of Helena wants to run for governor or Congress, but he's not ready to say if he'll run as a Democrat or Republican.

Power plant at Colstrip, MT.
Beth Saboe / MontanaPBS

A rewritten Republican plan aimed at protecting the future of the coal-fired power plant in Colstrip is moving forward. But concerns remain about its potential impact on Montanans’ electric bills.

When the so-called Montana Energy Security Act of 2019 was first introduced it drew comparisons to the deregulation of the Montana Power Company in the late 1990s, which skyrocketed electric bills across the state.

Can Do: Design By – And For – Women

11 hours ago
Mallory Ottariano, founder and CEO of Kind Apparel.
Courtesy of Elliott Natz

The very day Mallory Ottariano graduated from the University of Massachusetts Amherst with a degree in architecture and design, she bought a $100 sewing machine on eBay and started running an Etsy shop in the corner of her parents’ basement.

Seven years later, Ottariano’s design skills have fashioned Kind Apparel, a Missoula, Montana-based high-tech women’s adventure clothing line. Her colorful Lycra and fleece garments – made in the U.S. mostly out of recycled plastic bottles – have created thousands of loyal customers among indoors and outdoors women alike.

Northey Tretheway, with the Restore Our Creek Coalition, gives outgoing EPA Regional Administrator Doug Benevento a plaque honoring his work in Butte on March 21, 2019.
Nora Sacks / Montana Public Radio

In Butte Thursday, the Environmental Protection Agency set a date for an important milestone in the Mining City’s Superfund cleanup.

Next Friday, the agency says it will give federal court 135 days notice of filing a final consent decree laying out legally binding cleanup plans.

Firefighters spray a semi truck in the aftermath of a head-on collision on I-90 near Missoula, March 20, 2019.
Missoula Fire Department

A man killed when the car he was driving on the wrong side of the highway collided with a semi tractor trailer has been identified as 62-year-old Martin J. Elison, of Missoula.

The Montana Highway Patrol says Wednesday afternoon’s accident occurred in the westbound lanes of Interstate 90.

Andrew Anglin is the publisher of The Daily Stormer.
Wikipedia (CC-BY-SA-4)

MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) — A neo-Nazi website operator must disclose his net worth to attorneys for a Montana real estate agent who sued him for orchestrating an anti-Semitic "troll storm" against her family.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Jeremiah Lynch on Tuesday ordered The Daily Stormer founder Andrew Anglin to turn over a financial statement of his current net worth by March 29 or else the court will impose sanctions against him.

Montana Capitol, Helena, MT.
William Marcus / Montana Public Radio

A tax cut on social security income passed by both the state House and Senate is moving forward. The House Appropriations Committee voted Thursday to include the tax cut in the state budget. 

The priority bill for Senate Republican leadership would create significant changes in the amount of social security income that’s exempted when filing Montana tax returns.

Bill Aims To Change Education Of Dyslexic Kids

Mar 21, 2019
Montana Capitol.
Shaylee Rager / UM Legislative News Service

HELENA -- Sen. Cary Smith has a personal connection to a bill he is sponsoring in the Montana Legislature that would address how public schools screen for dyslexia.

“I thought that we’ve know about it for a long time, so obviously we’ve got great programs going to teach kids with dyslexia how to read, but it didn’t turn out that way for us with my granddaughter,” Smith said.

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