MTPR

Missing and murdered Indigenous people

  

The U.S. Attorney’s Office is hosting training sessions in Montana this week for indigenous communities about how to enter missing persons cases into a public database. Some people involved in the MMIP movement say that entries aren’t the problem. The database is.

Malinda Limberhand talks about the search for her daughter Hanna, during a Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Tribunal, Oct. 4, 2019.
Aaron Bolton / Montana Public Radio

Native advocates and the Blackfeet Nation late last week held what is being called the first-ever Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Tribunal in the U.S. The testimony from the families of missing and murdered Native people will be delivered to Congressional lawmakers in a push for policy change. Most family members focused on their frustrations with law enforcement.

A sign from a Jan. 9, 2019 missing and murdered Indigenous women vigil in Missoula.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

Montana’s Missing Indigenous Persons Task Force met for a third time  in Billings Friday, Sept. 27.

Charyl Eagle came to the meeting to make sure task force members address how meth and human trafficking might affect Montana’s high rate of missing indigenous people.

A sign from a Jan. 9, 2019 missing and murdered Indigenous women vigil in Missoula.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

A documentary debuting this fall will attempt to show how the high rate of missing and murdered indigenous women is impacting tribes, families and communities in Montana. The film is aimed at calling policy makers to action.


Montana Attorney General Tim Fox announced Monday he’s hired two specialists to help address the issue of missing and murdered indigenous women.

Over 100 paper bag luminaries lined the back of a conference room in Pablo, MT Aug. 27, 2019. The luminaries represent missing and murdered indigenous Montana women dating back to the early 1900s.
Aaron Bolton / Montana Public Radio

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes kicked off a conference Tuesday on missing and murdered indigenous people (MMIP). The three-day event is aimed at raising awareness about the work being done to understand the scope of the issue both on the reservation and in the state.

This is the second conference the tribes have held this year since passing a resolution in January that created a local MMIP working group.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office announced Thursday it won’t pursue federal charges in the death of a young girl whose body was found near Lame Deer on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation late last year. The Office determined it could not prove foul play.


Montana’s Missing Indigenous Persons Task Force met for the second time in Great Falls, Montana this weekend. The task force focused on the management of databases to find people and overlaps and gaps in jurisdictions for who is spearheading the search.


July is the second month in a row that two federal agencies have failed to provide input on five bills that address missing and murdered indigenous people, effectively stalling the bills.

Advocates say peoples’ lives hang in the balance.

After two years in the making, the Canadian government released its National Inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous persons on Monday. The report concluded that the violence committed against indigenous communities amounts to a “race-based genocide” by the Canadian government.

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