Montana Public Radio

Missing and murdered Indigenous people

 

Montana’s Missing Indigenous Persons Task Force is extending the deadline for tribal colleges to apply for a grant to start a missing persons database. That’s after no one applied the first time around.

 

President Donald Trump formed a task force to address missing and murdered indigenous people last month. 


A new report says the Keystone XL pipeline would exacerbate the problem of missing and murdered indigenous women in Montana and other Northern Plains states in the project’s proposed path.

 

As Attorney General William Barr visited Montana to unveil his plan to address the crisis of missing people in Indian Country, a tribe across the state has declared an emergency over what they say is a lack of policing on their reservation.

Confederated Salish and Kootenai Culture Committee Director’s Vernon Finley (L) and Tony Incashola (R) take photos with U.S. Attorney General William Barr after gifting him a blanket Friday, Nov. 22 at the CSKT Tribal Chambers in Pablo, MT.
Aaron Bolton / Montana Public Radio

U.S. Attorney General William Barr announced a new initiative to combat the missing and murdered indigenous persons (MMIP) issue in Indian Country Friday on the Flathead Indian Reservation.

 

The U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs advanced two bills this week that aim to beef up law enforcement’s response to the missing persons crisis in Indian Country.

  

The U.S. Attorney’s Office is hosting training sessions in Montana this week for indigenous communities about how to enter missing persons cases into a public database. Some people involved in the MMIP movement say that entries aren’t the problem. The database is.

Malinda Limberhand talks about the search for her daughter Hanna, during a Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Tribunal, Oct. 4, 2019.
Aaron Bolton / Montana Public Radio

Native advocates and the Blackfeet Nation late last week held what is being called the first-ever Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Tribunal in the U.S. The testimony from the families of missing and murdered Native people will be delivered to Congressional lawmakers in a push for policy change. Most family members focused on their frustrations with law enforcement.

A sign from a Jan. 9, 2019 missing and murdered Indigenous women vigil in Missoula.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

Montana’s Missing Indigenous Persons Task Force met for a third time  in Billings Friday, Sept. 27.

Charyl Eagle came to the meeting to make sure task force members address how meth and human trafficking might affect Montana’s high rate of missing indigenous people.

A sign from a Jan. 9, 2019 missing and murdered Indigenous women vigil in Missoula.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

A documentary debuting this fall will attempt to show how the high rate of missing and murdered indigenous women is impacting tribes, families and communities in Montana. The film is aimed at calling policy makers to action.

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