Montana Public Radio

Steve Daines

Montana's congressman votes as expected against impeachment, and Montana's two senators are having a very public spat. Gov. Gianforte has a rocky rollout of new orders lifting some pandemic restrictions. Attorney General Knudsen gets into a legal fight with a county attorney over local COVID-19 regulations. And university administrators keep a wary eye on a bill headed to the State Senate that would allow guns on campus.

Listen now on Capitol Talk with Sally Mauk, Holly Michels and Rob Saldin.

U.S. Capitol
iStock

Following last week’s insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by pro-Trump extremists, there have been unsubstantiated claims that those who stormed the building were anti-fascist groups.

Montana’s junior U.S. Senator said Tuesday there’s no evidence those groups took part in the mob. 

Montana's Republican Senator Steve Daines says calls for resignations and the impeachment of President Donald Trump aren’t helping the country heal after a mob of pro-Trump extremists stormed the U.S. Capitol last week.

YPR News’ Kevin Trevellyan spoke Friday with the Senator about how he views the mob and the aftermath.

Rep. Matt Rosendale
Corin Cates-Carny / Montana Public Radio

This week, Montana Representative Matt Rosendale became the third Congressman in Montana’s history to officially object to another states’ electoral results.

YPR News’ Rachel Cramer has been tracking this final step in certifying Pres.-elect Joe Biden’s win over Donald Trump. She shares her reporting with Nicky Ouellet.

A Coup Attempt, A Budget Proposal And COVID Confusion

Jan 9, 2021
'Capitol Talk' is MTPR's weekly legislative analysis program.
Montana Public Radio

Montana lawmakers had very different takes on Wednesday's insurrection and the unfounded claims that fueled it. Gov. Gianforte released his budget proposal. And the Legislature started out with confusing and contradictory COVID-19 protocols.

Listen now on Capitol Talk, with MTPR's Sally Mauk, Lee Newspapers State Bureau Chief Holly Michels and UM Political Science Professor Rob Saldin.

Courtesy

On Wednesday, pro-Trump extremists stormed the U.S. Capitol in Washington D.C., breaking down doors and forcing their way into both the Senate and House chambers. MTPR’s Aaron Bolton spoke with Montana’s Democratic Sen. Jon Tester about what he calls an attempted coup.

Demonstrators gather outside the Montana Capitol January 6, 2021 in support of President Trump's debunked claims of fraud in the presidential election.
Shaylee Ragar / Montana Public Radio

Montana state political leaders issued statements condemning pro-Donald Trump extremists who stormed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday.

A screenshot from C-SPAN shows a pro-Trump mob outside the U.S. Capitol Jan. 6, 2021 at 2:47 p.m. Members of the U.S. House and Senate were meeting in a joint session to certify states' electoral votes from the 2020 presidential election.
CSPAN

The three members of Montana’s congressional delegation in Washington, D.C., along with their staff, are safe following a group of pro-Trump extremists storming the U.S Capitol as a mob.

President Donald Trump and then Republican Senate candidate Matt Rosendale on stage during a July 5, 2018 rally in Great Falls, MT.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

Montana Rep. Matt Rosendale is joining a group of Republican U.S. Representatives who have announced their intention to object to Electoral College results from certain states during a joint session of Congress Wednesday.

Rosendale joins Montana Republican Sen. Steve Daines in calling for the creation of an Electoral Commission to conduct an emergency 10 day audit of election returns.

Rep. Lola Sheldon-Galloway (R) HD-22.
Montana Legislature

The Montana Republican Party is distancing itself from a statement signed by more than a dozen Republican lawmakers condemning the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes water compact. 


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