Montana Public Radio

Nick Mott

Nick Mott is a reporter who also works as producer at Threshold, a podcast and radio show. He holds an MA in journalism with a focus in environmental reporting from the University of Colorado Boulder.

A citizen committee appointed by Gov. Steve Bullock finalized a report on how the state should manage grizzly bears last week. They envisioned a future with fully recovered populations of grizzlies in Montana, but could not agree on what that future looks like, in particular when it comes to hunting.

Nathan Cook, FWP fisheries biologist, Beau Downing, Upper Clark Fork Restoration Manager with Montana's Resource Damage Program, & Alex Leone, restoration specialist with Clark Fork Coalition, scout deposits of mine waste along the upper Clark Fork River
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio

The state started new work this week to prevent toxic metals in century-old mine waste from seeping into the Upper Clark Fork River. 

On a warm August morning, representatives of Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, the state’s Natural Resource Damage Program, and the nonprofit Clark Fork Coalition and I set out on a bright green raft for a float just south of Deer Lodge.

People rally in Missoula June 6, 2020 during protests spurred by the death of George Floyd, a black man killed in police custody in Minneapolis.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio

The Missoula City Attorney’s Office announced it is pressing charges against a man that allegedly detained a Black Lives Matter protester at a rally outside the county courthouse in early June.

Grizzly bear. Stock photo.
(PD)

This week, a group of 18 Montanans appointed by Gov. Steve Bullock is meeting to finalize its recommendations on how the state should manage grizzly bears.

Grizzly bear.
(PD)

The roughly 700 grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park will remain federally protected under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed Wednesday. 

 

Protests against how the state and federal government is handling coronavirus have surged across the country and in Montana. Most recently, animal rights protestors gathered outside Rocky Mountain Labs in Hamilton where scientists are hard at work on a vaccine. But public opposition to scientific efforts has a long history in Montana. 

(L-R) Shaley Hall, London Marq and  Ja'Ton Simpson spoke during a Black Lives Matter rally in Missoula, June 14, 2020.
Sofia Stuar-Rasi / Montana Public Radio

A rally in Missoula Sunday drew hundreds to decry the presence of armed vigilantes at racial justice demonstrations. The gathering was spurred after one person was allegedly harassed and attacked by a group of armed individuals during a protest held at the county courthouse over a week ago.

Hunter with a rifle.
iStock

A group of Montanans working to form consensus over the future of grizzly bear management in the state is divided over the role of hunting as grizzly populations expand.

The governor’s Grizzly Bear Advisory Council, tasked with guiding the future of the bear's management in Montana, released draft recommendations last weekend.

Hundreds of people lie on N 27th St. and Second Ave. N in protest of police brutality at the Justice for George Floyd & Black, Indigenous and People of Color In Our Community/World in Billings June 7, 2020.
Nicky Ouellet / Yellowstone Public Radio

Over the past week thousands of people across Montana turned out for locally-organized rallies in support of black Americans and against police brutality. The rallies drew disparate crowds, and while talk got heated at times, the events remained non-violent.

Protesters at the Missoula courthouse June, 2, 2020. The death of George Floyd, a black man in Minnesota killed while in police custody, spurred protests across the country.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio

Protests in Montana over the death of George Floyd have remained peaceful, unlike others seen in large cities across the country. Montana police officers say they want to keep it that way, and denounce the excessive use of force by law enforcement. At the same time, public health officials are trying to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 as groups gather.

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