MTPR

Flathead Reservation


A program designed to address mental health awareness is coming to four high schools on the Flathead and the Rocky Boys Reservations this school year. It’s part of a co-institutional million-dollar grant between Montana State University Extension and Stone Child College.

Vanessa Fields, planning team leader for the National Bison Range, presenting at the public meeting in Polson May 1, 2019.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio


The latest step in a years-long process laying out the future of the National Bison Range Monday night dredged up questions of race and public land ownership that have lingered since a failed 2016 proposal to transfer the refuge to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. 

A sign at the National Bison Range in northwest Montana.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio


New possibilities for management of the National Bison Range north of Missoula are out, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is taking public comment on them at three meetings this week. 

Marita Growing Thunder (right) and an un-named person walking across the Flathead Reservation to raise awareness of missing and murdered indiginous women, March 28, 2019.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio

Advocates of missing and murdered indigenous women set off on a four-day trek in northwest Montana Thursday to raise awareness for the disproportionate rates of violence against Native women and girls. 

On asphalt and mud, grass and gravel, they walk.

People share their stories and call for action on behalf of their missing loved-ones during a Jan. 19 vigil for missing and murdered Indigenous women in Missoula, MT.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

Advocates for missing and murdered indigenous women will walk the length of the Flathead Reservation starting Thursday, March 28.

It’s the third year of the walk and this time it’s in honor of Jermain Charlo, who’s been missing for more than nine months.

CSKT Policy Analyst Jami Pluff is spearheading the formation of a work group to address missing and murdered indigenous women and girls on the Flathead Reservation. Jan. 7, 2019.
Nicky Ouellet / MTPR

As Congress and Montana lawmakers consider laws to address high rates of missing and murdered Native American women and girls, people in Indian Country have a question for the law enforcement officers and government officials tasked with protecting them.

Kate Vandemoer presents on the “People’s Compact,” a proposed alternative to the CSKT Water Compact in Kalispell on Dec. 10, 2018.
Nicky Ouellet / MTPR

Supporters of an alternative proposal to settle water rights claims on and around the Flathead Reservation have released a framework for what they would like to see in federal legislation. Meanwhile, their proposal is drawing condemnation and curiosity across the state.

Carl Glimm (R, HD6) voices support for the People's Compact as Albert Olszewski (R, SD6), Keith Regier (R, SD3), Mark Noland (R, HD10) and Mark Blasdel (R, SD4) look on in Polson on November 27.
Nicky Ouellet / MTPR

A group of self-described concerned citizens are proposing an alternative to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal Water Compact to settle water rights claims on and around the Flathead Reservation.

The state Legislature narrowly passed the CSKT Compact in 2015. It now awaits federal ratification.

Without a compact, some 10,000 tribal water claims extending farther east than Billings would need to be adjudicated individually.

A Senate bill that aimed to make it easier to get substance abuse treatment in Montana is likely dead.
iStock

MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) — A pharmacy on Montana's Flathead Indian Reservation has been fined $95,000 for failing to account for 2,500 oxyodone tablets from March 2017 to March 2018.

The Drug Enforcement Administration conducted an inspection of the tribal pharmacy in St. Ignatius after learning about the missing opioids. Inspectors found pharmacy staff were not adequately tracking controlled substances. The pharmacy also failed to report to the DEA that oxycodone was missing. 

Known and probable documented mortalities of grizzly bears in the NCDE from 2004 to 2018.
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks

2018 has been the deadliest year since scientists started keeping track for grizzlies in Northwest Montana.

"We did have a record high number of mortalities," says Cecily Costello, a grizzly bear research biologist for Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, and she’s talking about the huge swath of land in and around Glacier National Park, known as the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE). About a thousand bears live there.

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