Montana Public Radio

Can Do: Essential Business Lessons

  • Hosted by Arnie Sherman

Can Do, MTPR's podcast on business and entrepreneurship hosted by Arnie Sherman is in its fourth season, and we’re expanding. This season will feature the same informative interviews and the lessons Montana business owners and entrepreneurs have to share. But times are changing. There’s a major election in November and the COVID-19 pandemic continues to change how business is done.

The main focus this season is on the here & now. How does a business survive in today’s volatile economy? How can you transition your business or start a new one? What can you do to make sure your finances are in order? We’ll be asking these questions to business experts in Montana and around the country.

Listen to Can Do at www.mtpr.org or wherever you get your podcasts. New episodes are published every other Monday.

In November 2020, for most workers in the U.S., "business as usual" feels like a fairy tale. Working remotely, many parents are scrambling to handle their kids' education alongside their own jobs - or they've left the workplace altogether. Millions of others cope with unemployment, while "essential" on-site workers struggle to protect themselves and their families from workplace spread of COVID-19.

When the wild ride of the pandemic coasts to a stop, what will "normal" look like? This time on Can Do, Arnie Sherman talks with Stacy Maloney and Beth Humberd about the future of work.

Even in the best of times figuring out the right formula for managing your personal or business finances is a challenge. Now with the dual whammy of  COVID-19 and an associated economic recession, it is even more complicated. What mistakes are crucial to avoid? When is the right time to really hunker down?  Where can you cut spending and where should you invest?

Learn more now on this episode of Can Do.

Maureen Lonergan, Director of Global Training and Certification for Amazon Web Services, or AWS.
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What are the skills major tech companies are looking for in their workforce? What do businesses get for their investment in employee training? What type of workforce are we imagining for our economy a decade from now?

Learn more now with Can Do.

The COVID-19 pandemic and associated economic recession are casting differently-sized shadows across the United States. In Montana, unemployment has been high but never above the national average. Until early October 2020, the COVID infection rate remained comparatively low. 

One surprising effect has been the growing migration to the state, in particular to Missoula and Bozeman, from other parts of the U.S.

Dr. Michael Horowitz is the founding president of TCS Education System.
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What has been the real impact of COVID-19 on higher education? How will education adapt to the pandemic and the related recession? And can U.S. colleges and universities produce the skilled workforce that industries require? Learn more now with Can Do.

Allie Malis, American Airlines Flight Attendant and Government Relations Representative for the Association of Professional Flight Attendants.
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We are now more than 7 months into the COVID-19 pandemic and perhaps no industry has been more disrupted than transportation. Global air travel is down 85% from this time last year. Air carriers are set to lose more than $84B this fiscal year. NYC subway traffic is down 75% and more than 4,000 transport workers have contracted COVID-19 with more than 130 deaths reported.

The thoughts on everyone’s mind are, “when will it be safe to travel again?” and “will business travel ever be the same?” 

How does a business adapt to stay afloat in these unpredictable times? What are the steps you should be taking right now? Where can you turn for help? On today’s episode of Can Do, we’re asking our guests these questions and more.

Joe Anderson, co-founder of Reflex Protect
courtesy of Joe Anderson

In July 1993, a gunman opened fire at the San Francisco law firm of Pettit & Martin, killing eight people and wounding six more. Several of the casualties were friends and former colleagues of Joe Anderson, who'd worked at the firm. Joe is an entertainment attorney, a fourth-generation Montanan from Shelby, and a serial entrepreneur. After the shooting, an enduring question haunted him: “Is there a reliable way to stop violence without being violent?”

Sportswriter Chad Dundas has covered wrestling and mixed martial arts for ESPN, NBC Sports, the Associated Press, Sporting News, and since 2019, full-time for The Athletic. But like many Montanans, he doesn’t hold down just one job: he’s also an acclaimed novelist and short-story writer, a podcaster, and a wrestling promoter. Today on Can Do, we're asking: how does a solo practitioner hop between multiple gigs while keeping track of businessy details like contracts and taxes?

Dave McEvoy, co-founder and owner of Aerie Backcountry Medicine
courtesy of David McEvoy

What's Dave McEvoy's starting point for Aerie Backcountry Medicine's wilderness first responder training courses? The assumption that, in the backcountry, “no one is coming to help you.” What's the corollary? That an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. “First of all, what you mostly want is to not need help. So wilderness medicine classes are a lot about prevention.” Very basic prevention, it turns out, of blisters, hypothermia and twisted ankles - not to mention the potential hazards that accompany backcountry work and travel.

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