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Kate Vandemoer presents on the “People’s Compact,” a proposed alternative to the CSKT Water Compact in Kalispell on Dec. 10, 2018.
Nicky Ouellet / MTPR

Alternative Tribal Water Compact Draws Curiosity, Condemnation

Supporters of an alternative proposal to settle water rights claims on and around the Flathead Reservation have released a framework for what they would like to see in federal legislation . Meanwhile, their proposal is drawing condemnation and curiosity across the state.

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Camp on the Greenland ice sheet
Amy Martin

Threshold S02 Episode Twelve: Here Be Dragons

The Greenland ice sheet is basically a giant ice cube the size of Alaska. What happens when it melts? We spent five days camping out on the ice with a team of scientists who are trying to find out.

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Arts & Music

View of inversion over Missoula from Snowbowl
FLICKR USER, EVAN LOVELY (CC-BY-2.0)

Western Montana's Winter Inversions Explained

Since my recent move to Missoula from the sunny state of Florida, I had experienced many unfamiliar weather conditions. Montana residents might be well accustomed to snow, black ice, negative temperatures, and the season known as winter, but these were still novelties to me.

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Great Montana Read

Explores Stories From The Natural World

Season Two - The Arctic: what it is, what’s changing there, and why that matters for everybody.

Veterans Coming Home

Finding What Works

Veterans Coming Home aims to help veterans and their communities understand the opportunities and challenges faced during the transition to civilian life.

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Montana Court Overrules Attorney General On Easements

7 hours ago
Montana's Attorney General Tim Fox. file photo.
Courtesy Montana DOJ

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The Montana Supreme Court on Tuesday overruled Attorney General Tim Fox's legal opinion that the governor can't unilaterally approve large conservation easements and they must instead be authorized by the state Land Board.

Six of the seven justices on the state's high court signed the order siding with Gov. Steve Bullock, who argued that he doesn't need the Land Board's approval because conservation easements aren't land acquisitions. Justice Laurie McKinnon is the only justice who didn't sign.

The Clark Fork River near the University of Montana Campus, April 30, 2018.
Josh Burnham / MTPR

The Trump Administration’s plan to roll back an Obama-era policy designed to protect over half the nation’s waterways from pollution is drawing starkly different reactions in Montana.

The Montana Wildlife Federation’s Dave Chadwick condemns the re-write of the so-called “Waters of the United States” policy as a sweeping mistake.

Montana Senators Jon Tester and Steve Daines, with New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand at a press conference Tuesday.
Senator Jon Tester's office.

Both of Montana’s U.S. Senators are urging the Senate to pass the so-called Blue Water Veterans Act before the current Congress adjourns.

That bill would extend benefits to vets who served on ships during the Vietnam War who may have been exposed to Agent Orange. At present, only troops who served on land are eligible.

The Senate passed the farm bill on Dec. 11, 2018.
(PD)

Both of Montana’s senators voted for the farm bill, a multibillion-dollar legislative package to fund agriculture and food aid programs, which the Senate passed Tuesday.

The mammoth package will fund key farm safety net programs for the next five years without making significant changes to the food stamp program that serves nearly 40 million low-income Americans.

Kate Vandemoer presents on the “People’s Compact,” a proposed alternative to the CSKT Water Compact in Kalispell on Dec. 10, 2018.
Nicky Ouellet / MTPR

Supporters of an alternative proposal to settle water rights claims on and around the Flathead Reservation have released a framework for what they would like to see in federal legislation. Meanwhile, their proposal is drawing condemnation and curiosity across the state.

This handout was given to the State-Tribal Relations Committee, March 30, 2018. Annita Lucchesi, a doctoral student at Lethbridge University, in the Canadian province of Alberta, says native women make up 30 percent of missing persons in the state.
Corin Cates-Carney / MTPR

Hundreds of Indigenous women go missing under suspicious circumstance every year in North America. A U.S. Senate Committee takes a closer look at the issue Wednesday.

The Senate Indian Affairs Committee may hear startling statistics like this one during its hearing: Native Americans make up about 7 percent of Montana’s population. But according to Montana’s Native American Domestic Violence Review Commission, Native people are involved in 16 percent of all of the state’s intimate partner homicides.

A few months ago, Matthew Christian was at his house in Montana, going through his inbox, when he saw a message from a man named Patrick Freel in Jacksonville, Florida. In the message, Patrick said he was looking for his son's cards. It took a few more email exchanges before Matthew figured out that Patrick wasn't looking for his son's missing cards. He was looking for cards of his son: Ryan Freel, a former Major League Baseball player with a reputation for leaving it all on the field. Click the Link to read more from WBUR.

Threshold S02 Episode Twelve: Here Be Dragons

12 hours ago
Camp on the Greenland ice sheet
Amy Martin

The Greenland ice sheet is basically a giant ice cube the size of Alaska. What happens when it melts? We spent five days camping out on the ice with a team of scientists who are trying to find out.

Uphill skiing has become increasingly popular at ski hills like Whitefish Mountain Resort.
Whitefish Mountain Resort

When you think ski season, you probably think of people skiing downhill.

But using skis to hike uphill has increasingly become a sport of its own.

"Whitefish, in particular, has a very strong community for that," says Nick Polumbus, the director of marketing and sales at Whitefish Mountain Resort. 

Kim J. Hasenkrug, National Institutes of Health senior researcher at Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton.
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

An HIV researcher says the Trump administration has shut down an HIV research project at Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton that proposed using human fetal tissue.

In September, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced that it was auditing federal funding for research using fetal tissue and that it was ending its contract with the single company providing it to government researchers.

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