Montana Public Radio

Ryan Zinke

USDA NRCS

The Trump administration said Wednesday a resumption of coal sales from public lands that had been blocked under former President Barack Obama will result in a negligible increase in greenhouse gas emissions.

This week on Campaign Beat: Sen. Tester has some qualms about Bernie Sanders topping the Democratic ticket for president. Sen. Daines has no qualms about whether President Trump should stay in office. Former Montana congressman and U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke resurfaces. And Montana lawmakers revisit annual sessions.

Listen now with MTPR's Sally Mauk, Lee Newspapers Capitol Reporter Holly Michaels and University of Montana Political Science Professor and Mansfield Center Fellow Rob Saldin.

Former Interior secretary and Montana Congressman Ryan Zinke.
Nicky Ouellet / Montana Public Radio

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Former Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has closed his congressional campaign account and given nearly all of the fundraising cash that was left to a charitable foundation he started and his wife now runs.

This week on "Campaign Beat:" Governor Bullock's presidential race is over - but Democrats still hope he jumps into the Senate race. Both primaries in the governor's race have strong challengers to the frontrunners. And U.S. House candidate Corey Stapleton comes under fire for a controversial newsletter.

Vanessa Fields, planning team leader for the National Bison Range, presenting at the public meeting in Polson May 1, 2019.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio


The latest step in a years-long process laying out the future of the National Bison Range Monday night dredged up questions of race and public land ownership that have lingered since a failed 2016 proposal to transfer the refuge to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. 

Former US Interior Boss Parlays Post Into Private Career

Apr 24, 2019
Former Interior secretary and Montana Congressman Ryan Zinke.
Nicky Ouellet / Montana Public Radio

Corrected April 24, 2019

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Former U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is quickly parlaying his time in President Donald Trump's cabinet into a lucrative private career.

He's landed a more than $100,000-a-year post at a Nevada mining company and is pursuing involvement in natural gas exports that have surged under Trump, Zinke told The Associated Press Tuesday.

An informational sign at the entrance of the National Bison Range near Moiese, MT.
Josh Burnham

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) have told Montana’s congressional delegation and the U.S. Department of Interior that it wants management of the National Bison Range restored to the tribes.

Under the proposal, tribal leaders would continue to prioritize bison conservation at the 19,000-acre refuge near Charlo, which the federal government would own in a trust.

Former US Interior Boss Takes Job At Investment Company

Jan 14, 2019
Ryan Zinke.
(PD)

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Former U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has gotten a job with a private investment company after leaving the Trump administration amid unresolved ethics investigations.

North Carolina-based Artillery One said Monday that Zinke has been hired as managing director and will pursue investing opportunities in energy, financial technology and cybersecurity.

Zinke: Park Visitors Should 'Grab a trash bag'

Jan 4, 2019
Former Interior secretary and Montana Congressman Ryan Zinke.
Nicky Ouellet / Montana Public Radio

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — 10:50 a.m.: Former U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke says National Park visitors should "grab a trash bag and take some trash out" as garbage bins at some parks overflow during the government shutdown.

Sage grouse.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Pacific Southwest Region (PD)

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Trump administration moved forward Thursday with plans to ease restrictions on oil and natural gas drilling, mining and other activities across millions of acres in the American West that were put in place to protect an imperiled bird species.

Land management documents released by the U.S. Interior Department show the administration intends to open more public lands to leasing and allow waivers for drilling to encroach into the habitat of greater sage grouse.

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