Montana Public Radio

Arts & Culture

Author interviews, food, natural history, poetry, and more from "The Write Question", "The Food Guys", "Field Notes", "Home Ground Radio", "Front Row Center", and "Reflections West".

Dr. Michael Horowitz is the founding president of TCS Education System.
courtesy

What has been the real impact of COVID-19 on higher education? How will education adapt to the pandemic and the related recession? And can U.S. colleges and universities produce the skilled workforce that industries require? Learn more now with Can Do.

'The Food Guys' Rap About Confit

Sep 27, 2020
Flickr user, Alpha (CC-BY-2.0)

Cook pork or waterfowl at very low temperature for a long time in fat, and you've got confit, or preserved meat. It's an old specialty of southwest France, where goose, duck or pork confit is often served as part of cassoulet. Food Guys Jon and Greg explain why a cooked goose enveloped in a bed of its own fat is not alarming, but delicious.

Helen L. Rietz

Artist Helen L. Rietz is one of the more unique and recognizable artists in Montana. Working exclusively in the notoriously unforgiving medium of watercolor, her abandoned subjects are juxtaposed with the natural beauty of the Montana landscapes surrounding them. Her 33 piece exhibit entitled "Bypassed," recently opened in the Holter Museum in Helena Montana

Listen to Rietz's interview with MTPR's Tom Berich now.

The Ungulate Mating Calendar Demands Tight Timing

Sep 22, 2020
Skeeze - Pixabay

I've seen white-tailed does and fawns in my yard all spring and summer. But just last week I saw two bucks. Why would bucks show up now, when it seemed that only does and fawns lived in the area? Well, if spring is for the birds, then fall would have to be the season for ungulates.

Some Meals Just Taste Better The Next Day

Sep 20, 2020
Gilmar Koizumi-Pixabay

Food Guy Jon Jackson recalls the words of cauldron-stirring Mrs. Minervini as she prepared for invasion by a casual weekend army of neighborhood children: "When you're cooking that marinara sauce, you've got to turn it off at some point and let it sit for awhile. Then you can go on and finish it off before the people come. You want to serve it hot, but it's no good cooking it right straight through."

Wolverines: Wild Weasels Of The Alpine

Sep 15, 2020
Wolverine
Andrew Gainer (CC-BY-NC-2)

A small dark blur upslope materialized into a loping wolverine, coming straight toward us! Afraid this wolverine wanted to share our lunch, we left our backpacks where they lay, and hurried out of its path.

Allie Malis, American Airlines Flight Attendant and Government Relations Representative for the Association of Professional Flight Attendants.
Courtesy

We are now more than 7 months into the COVID-19 pandemic and perhaps no industry has been more disrupted than transportation. Global air travel is down 85% from this time last year. Air carriers are set to lose more than $84B this fiscal year. NYC subway traffic is down 75% and more than 4,000 transport workers have contracted COVID-19 with more than 130 deaths reported.

The thoughts on everyone’s mind are, “when will it be safe to travel again?” and “will business travel ever be the same?” 

skeeze-Pixabay

Food Guy Greg Patent writes: "I’ve been pizza crazy lately, and I want to share with you a terrific, authentic recipe for Neapolitan Pizza dough, created by Johnny (Gianni) Di Francesco. I happened across a YouTube video of him, and he has so much to say and demonstrate, you just must have a look. But before we do, I want to tell you about this terrific pizza dough."

Lichens are a combination of fungi and algae living together in a symbiotic relationship. In this symbiosis, the fungi and algae benefit from each other. This evolutionary adaptation allows lichens to grow in some incredibly harsh environments: in deserts and in the Arctic, on barren tundra and on bare rock. Lichens grow in such rugged environments that some early naturalists thought they existed on nothing but air and sunlight.

spinach
Free Photos - Pixabay

“It’s just that we still have so much of it," said Dorothy Patent about the leafy bunches of spinach filling the fridge a week after Greg's most recent farmers market foray.  So Greg got busy with spinach, ham, mustard, macaroni - and one skillet. The results are below.

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