Montana Public Radio

Medicaid expansion

Mail ballots for Montana's June 2 primary go out this Friday. This weekend, Democrats and Republicans vying for Montana's governor's seat faced off in a virtual debate hosted by the Montana Broadcasters Association. Corin Cates-Carney, with the help of Nicky Ouellet, recap the gubernatorial debate.

Gubernatorial debates get testy as the primary gets closer. The race for attorney general features four experienced candidates. House Republican candidate Matt Rosendale emphasizes familiar themes in a new campaign ad. Democrat Kathleen Williams is the fundraising leader in the House race. And how former Congressman Ron Marlenee left a lasting mark on Montana's Republican politics

Listen now on Campaign Beat, with Sally Mauk, Rob Saldin and Holly Michels.

This week we are airing conversations with some of the candidates running for Montana governor as the June 2 primary approaches.

Republican Greg Gianforte has been Montana’s U.S. Representative since 2017. He spoke with YPR New’s Jess Sheldahl this week about why he came to Montana, his business experience, and the Affordable Care Act.

 

This week we are airing conversations with some of the candidates running for Montana governor as the June 2 primary approaches.

Lt. Governor Mike Cooney, a Democrat, has been an elected official in one capacity or another in Montana since the '70s. He spoke with YPR New's Jess Sheldahl this week about his experience in state government, healthcare and his campaign.

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As the COVID-19 pandemic tightens its grip, the services provided by Montana’s mental health and addiction clinics are getting even more complicated.

Those who survived the 2017 state budget cuts have hung on by their fingernails ever since. And it may get a lot more difficult.

Officials say it could take more than a year to add new "community engagement" requirements to the state’s Medicaid expansion.
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Officials say it could take more than a year to add new "community engagement" requirements to the state’s Medicaid expansion.

Montana is awaiting federal approval for its plan to require some low-income adults to work for health coverage.

People on Medicaid who work rural seasonal jobs in Montana are wondering about the future of their access to health coverage. Montana recently passed a law that, if it gains federal approval and goes into effect as planned in January, would require many Medicaid recipients to prove they work a set number of hours each month.

Timeline for HELP Program/Medicaid Expansion Waiver
Montana DPHHS

Friday was the deadline for public input on the Montana health department’s draft proposal to add work and community service requirements to the state’s health coverage program for low income adults.

At the end of the month, Montana’s Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) plans to send the federal government the new outline of the state’s Medicaid expansion program, which covers around 90,000 people.

People line up to testify during a hearing on the revised Medicaid expansion bill at the Montana Legislature, March 16, 2019.
Montana Legislature

Plans to tie work requirements to next year’s Medicaid expansion are worrying some of the state’s Medicaid recipients, and they used Thursday’s public meeting in Helena to let state officials know.

Gov. Steve Bullock is joined by Rep. Mary Caferro, a Democrat from Helena, and Rep. Ed Buttrey, a Republican from Great Falls, and other lawmakers for the signing of HB 658, May 9, 2019. The bill reauthorizes the state's Medicaid expansion program.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

New analysis from the state health department shows the new Medicaid work requirements set to take effect on Jan. 1 will apply to more Montanans than expected — up to three times more.

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