Montana Public Radio

impeachment

Updated at 12:12 p.m. ET

The House Judiciary Committee on Friday approved two articles of impeachment against President Trump, making him the fourth president in American history to face impeachment.

In contrast to Thursday's contentious back-and-forth between the two parties, Friday's session was devoid of rancor, or even any debate. Immediately after calling the session to order, Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., ordered two votes, one for each article. Both were approved 23-17 along party lines.

As the impeachment inquiry against President Trump has unfolded, one name in particular has surfaced over and over again in both private hearing transcripts and public testimony: the president's personal lawyer, Rudolph Giuliani.

Congressional testimony has placed Giuliani at the center of the Ukraine affair, with multiple witnesses telling House investigators that he helped spearhead an irregular diplomatic channel between the U.S. and Ukraine.

U.S. Capitol Illustration
Annette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

The House Judiciary Committee is considering two articles of impeachment against President Trump: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Watch live as the panel debates and then votes on the allegations Wednesday and Thursday.

The hearings are expected to begin at 5 p.m. Mountain Time on Wednesday and 7 a.m. Mountain Time on Thursday. We can't confirm when the hearings will end. These hearings will not be broadcast on MTPR but you can listen online by choosing the Yellowstone Public Radio stream from the player at the top of our website.

Updated at 11:43 a.m. ET

House Democrats announced Tuesday that they will bring two articles of impeachment against President Trump: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

"President Trump has acted in a manner contrary to his trust as President and subversive of constitutional government, to the great prejudice of the cause of law and justice, and to the manifest injury of the people of the United States," the resolution reads.

Updated at 8:50 p.m. ET

House Democrats unveiled two articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday morning, charging him with abuse of power in the Ukraine affair and obstruction of Congress.

Read the articles of impeachment here.

U.S. Capitol Illustration
Annette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

As it moves toward drafting articles of impeachment, the House Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing on the impeachment inquiry report completed by the House Intelligence Committee.

Watch the hearing here Monday, Dec. 9 starting around 7 a.m. Mountain Time, or listen live on MTPR. Regularly schedule programming will resume after the hearing ends.

President Trump has decided to stay out of the impeachment inquiry being conducted by the House of Representatives.

White House counsel Pat Cipollone rejected an offer from House Democrats that would have allowed the president to send counsel to represent him at future impeachment hearings.

In a short two-paragraph letter to Democrats, Cipollone said the impeachment inquiry is "completely baseless and has violated basic principles of due process and fundamental fairness."

Greg Gianforte helps warm-up the crowd before President Trump arrives at a Missoula, MT campaign rally, Oct. 18, 2018.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

Montana’s lone voice in the U.S. House is blasting Democrats following Thursday's announced drafting of the articles of impeachment against President Trump.

U.S. Capitol Illustration
Annette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

The House Judiciary Committee is holding its first hearing in the impeachment inquiry focused on constitutional grounds for impeachment. The Judiciary Committee is tasked with drafting potential articles of impeachment against President Trump.

Watch the hearing here Wednesday, Dec. 4 starting at 8 a.m. Mountain Time, or listen live on MTPR. Regularly schedule programming will resume after the hearing ends.

House Republicans have released their report on the impeachment inquiry into President Trump.

The release of the report from Republicans on the House Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs committees comes after more than a dozen witnesses testified both behind closed doors and in public hearings over nearly two months. The panel's Democratic majority has not yet released its own report on the inquiry.

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