MTPR

Kayla Desroches

Kayla Desroches reports for Yellowstone Public Radio in Billings. She was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, and stayed in the city for college, where she hosted a radio show that featured serialized dramas like the Shadow and Suspense. In her pathway to full employment, she interned at WNYC in New York City and KTOO in Juneau, Alaska. She then spent a few years on the island of Kodiak, Alaska, where she transitioned from reporter to news director before moving to Montana.


An association of oil and gas industry members from Montana met in Billings this week to talk about issues the industry is facing, like transporting crude oil.

Montana proposed regulations on Friday that outline what facilities need to do to dispose of radioactive waste while also monitoring for environmental side effects.

A medical center dedicated exclusively to injury rehabilitation opened in Billings this week. They say their facility is unique in the state.


  Montana received almost $4 million in federal funds for addiction recovery and treatment this week.


A study recently found that roughly three-quarters of new homes in Montana meet state energy codes meant to curb electricity bills and increase durability.


A former Montana high school athletics trainer was sentenced to 12 years in federal prison on Tuesday for sexually abusing boys in Miles City. YPR News’ Kayla Desroches was in the federal courtroom during the sentencing hearing and shares her reporting with Nicky Ouellet.


Dozens of men have accused former Miles City athletic trainer James “Doc” Jensen of sexual abuse dating back to when they were student-athletes in high school.


A group of rabbis in Montana sent an open letter to Republican U.S. Sen. Steve Daines this week following his recent Tweet in support of Pres. Donald Trump.

Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly named Kenzie House as Sober Beginning's third sober home. Kacy Keith and Traci Jordan recently opened Ruthie House.

Three new sober homes have opened in Billings this summer. The women behind them say dorm-style houses offer a safe space for people working through addiction. But some treatment providers say sober living homes are part of a larger system of treatment that needs improvement.

A new report says Montana could save money on Medicaid by providing housing and support services to homeless people.

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