MTPR

forestry

State Agency Looks To More Logging, Improved Forest Health

Mar 8, 2019

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Montana's forestry agency is working with federal, local and private organizations to increase logging on national forests to improve forest health and decrease the risk of disease and catastrophic fires.

State lawmakers are supporting a $2.2 million request from the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation to hire people to help implement the Good Neighbor Authority program.

The 2,100-acre Weed Lake project is entirely within the wildland-urban interface on the east side of Swan Lake, approximately 14 miles outside Bigfork.
USDA

The Flathead National Forest announced Monday that it has approved a pair of vegetation management projects that it says will improve forest health and increase resistance to wildfires.

The U.S. Forest Service and Montana DNRC work to plant more than 13,000 whitebark pine seedlings in the Swan Mountain Range as a cooperative post-burn restoration project on June 18, 2018.
Nicky Ouellet / MTPR

A team of researchers at the University of Montana has received a $700,000 grant from NASA to promote reforestation efforts across the western United States.

The grant will allow UM’s researchers to develop a set of tools to help the U.S. Forest Service improve its decision-making process following major disturbances like wildfires.

A map of vegetation treatments planned for the Betty Baptiste Project on the east side of Hungry Horse Reservoir in Montana.
Flathead National Forest

A logging and forest restoration project on the east side of Hungry Horse Reservoir has been OK'd by the Flathead National Forest.

The draft decision kicks off a 45-day objection period, during which people or groups who have previously commented on the project can file an objection.

The U.S. Forest Service and Montana DNRC work to plant more than 13,000 whitebark pine seedlings in the Swan Mountain Range as a cooperative post-burn restoration project on June 18, 2018.
Nicky Ouellet / MTPR

After a wildfire, forest managers know that a forest can and will bounce back on its own. Still, the U.S. Forest Service doles out millions of dollars each year for post-burn restoration and rehabilitation.

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