Montana Public Radio

Kevin Trevellyan

Kevin is a UM Journalism graduate student and reporter for Yellowstone Public Radio.


Democratic members of a Montana legislative committee prematurely left a meeting today in what one lawmaker is calling a protest of Republicans not wearing face masks at the Capitol.


This week, Montana’s Republican candidate for governor unveiled what he’s billing a comeback plan for the state.


Montana’s Democratic candidate for governor today unveiled a plan he says will protect public lands and access to them.


Montana lawmakers were briefed on a draft legislative study about water rights in the age of climate change.


Six more residents of a corrections facility in Billings have tested positive for COVID-19 amid a steep rise in cases in the county where it’s located.

Linda Watson shuffling through Little Shell Tribe enrollment applications.
Kevin Trevellyan / Yellowstone Public Radio

Roughly six months ago, the federal government officially recognized the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians as a sovereign nation. It was national news then. But what does it mean now for the members and descendants of Little Shell? Nine students from the University of Montana School of Journalism spent a semester reporting on the impact of recognition on what has long been considered Montana’s “landless tribe.” This story is part of the student-produced series, Project Little Shell.

 

News broke on Fourth of July that a handful of Montana’s high-profile elected officials and political candidates were potentially exposed to COVID-19 during two of President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign events. This week, we learned where those events took place and who attended. YPR News’ Kevin Trevellyan spoke with Maritsa Georgiou of NBC Montana, who had the scoop.

Residents of a corrections facility in Billings remain quarantined amid two recently-discovered COVID-19 cases. Multiple residents say they're concerned the virus could spread further within the building following what they call insufficient care for their safety.

 

Two residents of a corrections facility in Billings have tested positive for COVID-19.


It’s the start of the month, which means housing payments are due for many Montanans. Amid the economic fallout of the novel coronavirus pandemic, there doesn’t yet appear to be large spikes in evictions and foreclosures. But state officials are still having trouble distributing federal housing relief dollars to the people who need them.

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