Montana Public Radio

Maxine Speier

Reporter

Maxine is the Morning Edition Host and reporter for MTPR. She got her start at MTPR as a student intern reporting for Montana News during the 2017 fire season. 

Maxine is a graduate of the University of Montana's master's journalism program and has a bachelor's degree from Vassar College. She was an editorial fellow covering the environment for Pacific Standard magazine. When Maxine's not behind the microphone, she's either skiing, hiking with her two poorly-behaved dogs, or lost in a book.

Montanas are being asked to report Census data online or by phone even without receiving a specialized ID code to begin the process.
U.S. Census Bureau

The U.S. Census Bureau says that area offices in 13 states will reopen for limited field operations this week, including one in Billings. MTPR reports Montana is one of a few states where the Census count has experienced severe setbacks in light of the pandemic.

COVID-19 Couch Concerts

Bars and music venues across the country have shuttered their doors to slow the spread of the new coronavirus, but many musicians are still finding ways to perform during the pandemic through livestream shows being called "COVID-19 Couch Concerts." With gigs and tours postponed or canceled, performers have turned to impromptu live shows on the internet.

U.S. Census hiring week kicked off Monday. Across the country that means the launch of targeted television ads and posters aimed at getting people to apply for the half a million temporary jobs the Census Bureau needs to fill before next spring.

Identification from patients picking up prescriptions for opioid painkillers like hydrocodone or oxycodone.
iStock

Starting this week pharmacies in Montana will need to see identification from patients picking up prescriptions for opioid painkillers like hydrocodone or oxycodone.

Missoula High School students join in the nationwide "climate strike", March 15, 2019.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

More than 5,000 climate strikes led by kids are set to take place around the world Friday. Students, including some in Montana, plan on skipping school to protest inaction on climate change.

In Missoula, high school and university students plan to walk out of class to draw attention to what they say is a climate crisis that needs to be addressed.

A table from the Montana Kids Count databook for 2018, showing social and economic characteristics in the state.
Montana Kids County

The number of children living in poverty in Montana has gone down since 2010. So has the number of children without health insurance. That's according to the latest update to the 2018 KIDS COUNT report.

White-tailed deer.
(PD)

People around the world, especially those who eat venison, are worried Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) might one day spread from animals to humans. But researchers at Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton say evidence suggests that’s not going to happen.

Mule deer.
(PD)

Across the country there’s growing concern that Chronic Wasting Disease, found in wildlife, might someday spread to humans. Scientists speaking Thursday, April 11 in Hamilton will address some of the public’s uncertainty and concern head-on.

Indian Health Service logo.
Indian Health Service / IHS

Native American health advocates are worried the legal battle over the Affordable Care Act will end significant gains for Indian health care.

They say if the Obama-era healthcare act is dismantled, that would also strip away laws that provide funding for tribal health care.

A firefighter stands in front of flames from a wildfire. Stock photo.
(PD)

Scientists at the University of Montana have found that climate change is already reducing the ability of some forests in the western U.S. to bounce back after wildfire. Their findings are confirming a long-suspected change.

For the past three years, UM post-doc Kimberly Davis has looked at how ponderosa pine and Douglas fir forests regenerate after fire, and she’s made an eye-opening discovery.

Pages