MTPR

Corin Cates-Carney

Capitol Reporter

Corin Cates-Carney is the Capitol Bureau reporter for MTPR,  Corin was formerly MTPR's Flathead area reporter.

Corin has worked for NPR, and is a UM Journalism School Graduate.

Contact Corin Cates-Carney:
Email: corin.cates-carney@mtpr.org
Mobile: 253-495-5193
Capitol Office:  406-444-9399

Ways to Connect

"Issue advocacy" mailers from the 2012 Montana elections.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

An Illinois advocacy group is suing Montana Gov. Steve Bullock over one of his trademark campaign finance policies targeting so-called 'dark money' in politics.

The lawsuit announced Wednesday asks a federal judge to strike down Montana’s nearly year-old policy that requires certain businesses seeking contracts with the state to disclose donors and spending on elections.

The Montana SOS Office is holding a certification event for the ExpressVote voting system Tue, Aug 28, in Helena. The device is designed to help people with disabilities vote, but local election officials will urge everyone to use them in coming elections
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

The Montana Secretary of State’s office plans to sign-off on a new touchscreen voting system designed for voters with disabilities that could be used at county polling sites as early as this November.

The ExpressVote system resembles a touchscreen desktop computer or ATM. Voters insert a ballot, scroll through pages of candidates or initiatives and make their picks, and then hit print.

Timeline for HELP Program/Medicaid Expansion Waiver
Montana DPHHS

Friday was the deadline for public input on the Montana health department’s draft proposal to add work and community service requirements to the state’s health coverage program for low income adults.

At the end of the month, Montana’s Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) plans to send the federal government the new outline of the state’s Medicaid expansion program, which covers around 90,000 people.

Pistol
(PD)

The inaugural Jeremy Bullock Safe Schools Summit held in Butte this week brought around 150 teachers, school administrators, law enforcement and mental health workers together to talk through the growing concern about violence in schools. The summit is named after Jeremy Bullock, an 11-year-old boy shot and killed on a school playground in Butte 25 years ago.

Montana Public Radio's Corin Cates-Carney spoke with Jeremy's parents Robin and Bill Bullock during the convention this week.

Bill Bullock stands on a stage at a Butte convention center, August 20, 2019 during the first Jeremy Bullock Safe School Summit. Jeremy, Bill's son, was shot and killed on the playground of Margaret Leary Elementary, in Butte, in the spring of 1999.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

Twenty-five years ago, 11-year-old Jeremy Bullock was shot by a classmate on the playground of Butte’s Margaret Leary Elementary. It was reportedly the youngest school shooting death in U.S. history at the time. 

A barbecue set up next to the Safeway in Helena sells burgers and hotdogs August 19, 2019 to benefit the Lewis and Clark Rural Fire Council. The group of more than a dozen departments builds communication among them during firefighting planning.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

Rural volunteer firefighters were some of the first crews on the scene when the North Hills Fire broke out near Helena in late July, and threatened hundreds of homes. Monday, some of those firefighters were raising money in Helena.

Helena National Forest
Forest Service Northern Region (PD)

The U.S. Forest Service is asking for input on a 140,000 acre management project in the Big Belt Mountains, northeast of Helena. But there are few details of what exactly the agency is proposing. 

Kathy Bushnell with the Helena-Lewis and Clark National Forest says the Middleman Project includes the Avalanche drainage continuing north to the Trout Creek drainages of the Big Belts.

“The end goal is to have a healthier and more resilient forest," Bushnell says. "And then also to reduce the fire risk to communities, and homes, and people, and firefighters.”

Voter values, 2018 Montana Elections Surveys. Data collected by the Human Ecology Learning & Problem Solving (HELPS) Lab, Montana State University‐Bozeman.
Cassidy Alexander, via Datawrapper / Montana Public Radio

New data released from a survey of Montana voters reveals details in the state’s political divides. It shows what voters think of candidates not originally from Montana, whether people think teachers should be able to carry guns in schools, and voters preferences on government spending and their trust in the news media.

The information comes from a pre- and post-2018-election poll from Montana State University and the Montana Television Network.

NorthWestern Energy building in Butte, Montana.
Nora Saks / Montana Public Radio

A Montana District Judge says state utility regulators erroneously gave NorthWestern Energy a pass from a legal requirement to buy power from local small-scale renewable energy projects. 

Courtesy of Mike Madel

A Montana wildlife management specialist says one of the oldest male grizzly bears recorded along the Rocky Mountain Front was euthanized this week for killing livestock. 

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