MTPR

Steve Bullock

Doctor's office.
iStock.

Pieces of the state budget that fell apart over the last year and a half are starting to get put back together. Last week, Governor Steve Bullock released a plan that outlined $45 million in budget restorations now that the state has collected more revenue than was forecast last year.

Most of the restorations are going to the state health department, which took the biggest budget cuts in January and reduced services for the poor, elderly and disabled.

Governor Bullock releases the 2018 Labor Day report, September 4, 2018 in Helena. The report says Montana wages continue to grow but the state faces a looming worker shortage as Baby Boomers retire.
Corin Cates-Carney

Governor Steve Bullock says wages and personal income are growing in Montana. But a worker shortage is adding pressure to the state’s labor force.

The Bullock administration’s yearly report card on the state economy highlights Montana as having the 4th fastest wage growth among states in the last decade, along with real GDP growth over that time that outpaced the nation.

Montana Capitol, Helena, MT.
William Marcus


More than $45 million of the state budget will be restored under a plan by Governor Steve Bullock. It will unwind budget cuts enacted over the last year that have devastated parts of Montana's health care community.

Many of Montana’s poorest and most vulnerable people — and the health care providers who serve them — are anxiously awaiting news from Governor Steve Bullock this week. Bullock is expected to release his plan to restore some funding to health programs for the state’s poor and disabled that have been devastated by budget cuts over the last year.

MTPR Capitol Reporter Corin Cates-Carney is here now to talk about the upcoming announcement.

More details on Governor Steve Bullock’s plan to restore parts of the state budget are expected this week.

On Tuesday, the state health department says it will issue a new rule that will restore a nearly 3 percent cut to how much it pays doctors, clinics and other health care providers who see Medicaid patients, retroactive to July 1 of this year. That’s two months ahead of when the department initially said providers could expect that rate restoration.

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