MTPR

Endangered Species Act

Longtime grizzly advocate Mike Bader presents at a letter-writing meetup for Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks' new grizzly rule.
Nick Mott / MTPR

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) says Monday’s federal ruling to put grizzlies in and around Yellowstone National Park back on the Endangered Species List will not affect the agency’s work on a new rule that will dictate how Montana will manage grizzlies in and around Glacier National Park if that population is removed from the Endangered Species List.

Bear country sign.
YellowstoneNPS (CC-BY-2.0)

Public meetings on how the state will deal with the growing number of grizzly bears around Glacier National Park if they’re removed from the endangered species list begin this week.

Starting Tuesday, Sept. 18 in Great Falls, the meetings are about a proposed Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks rule saying Montana aims to maintain a population of at least 800 bears in what’s known as the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem, a swath of land home to the largest grizzly population in the lower 48.

Grizzly bear. File photo.
iStock

The first grizzly bear hunt in Wyoming and Idaho in more than 40 years has been delayed until at least the end of the month while a federal judge in Missoula decides if Yellowstone-area grizzlies should be removed from the endangered species list.

Grizzly bear. File photo.
(PD)

Opponents of removing Yellowstone-area grizzly bears from the endangered species list asked a federal judge Wednesday to put a second delay on grizzly hunts that were slated to start at the beginning of September in Wyoming and Idaho.

A record number of grizzly bears are being killed by cars as they roam the roads in and around Glacier National Park in northwestern Montana. At the same time, they're causing an unprecedented amount of damage to crops and livestock.

Pages