MTPR

Arts & Culture

Author interviews, food, natural history, poetry, and more from "The Write Question", "The Food Guys", "Field Notes", "Home Ground Radio", "Front Row Center", and "Reflections West".

Recipe: Gâteau Breton

Sep 15, 2019
Flickr user, Rebecca Siegel. (CC-BY-2.0)

Brittany is well-known for its butter -- as is this small Breton cake, which uses eight ounces of butter to nine ounces of flour.  You can quickly whirl together its five ingredients in a food processor. Greg Patent first tried Gâteau Breton on vacation in San Francisco and was enchanted by its slightly chewy texture and Wall Of Butter wallop.

iStock

There is an ant and she is next to my foot, dragging a fly up the same hill that I have just stopped trying to drag myself up.  All worker ants are females and this particular female has a black fly in her mandibles, but she’s having a hard time keeping it there because she is negotiating her way backwards through lichen, and the uncooperative (i.e., dead) fly keeps getting hung up.

  

With startling wisdom and humor, Maybe You Should Talk to Someone  takes readers into both Lori Gottlieb’s therapy office where she sees patients and into her own therapist’s office where she lands after a crisis. But really, the book is about the universal human condition. Lori writes about topics that make people think differently about themselves and the world around them: love and loss, meaning and mortality, gender and culture, parents and children, female appearance, regret and redemption, hope and change.

When Old-Fashioned Applesauce Gets A Little Too Old

Sep 8, 2019
Linda (CC-BY-NC-2.0)

If you're a Food Guy, now is the time to clear out last year's homemade applesauce from your cupboard, to make way for this year's batches. Applesauce lasts a long time -- even longer when you freeze it -- but you'll make headway on the old stuff if you start using it as a topping on pancakes or yogurt, or as a milk substitute when you bake cakes, muffins and some pies and cookies.

A Fisher's Guide To Preying On Porcupines

Sep 8, 2019
Fisher (Pekania pennanti), the carnivorous mustelid that co-evolved with porcupines
(U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 5)

As my dog starts to circle, the porcupine turns its rear end to my dog and begins to back into him, thrashing its tail back and forth. Lunging at the porcupine, my dog comes up with a face full of quills. As he winces back to my side, I begin to wonder what type of animal has the ability to prey upon a porcupine without receiving a penalty for its meal.

Can Do: How MyVillage Is Working To Remake Childcare

Sep 6, 2019
In 2017, two mothers from Montana launched MyVillage, a platform that connects parents with trained, licensed daycare providers.
Screen capture from myvillage.com, Sept. 6, 2019.

According to the Center for American Progress, 51% of Americans live in a daycare desert; a place with almost no openings for infants or toddlers in nearby licensed preschools. Those lucky enough to find openings often spend more on childcare than they can afford, and many educators can’t earn enough as preschool teachers to make ends meet.

"I think fear is for people who don't get out very much. The flipside of fear is understanding. We gain understanding when we travel ... Get out, celebrate the diversity, be inspired," says Rick Steves, host of Travel with Rick Steves.

The program joined MTPR's new radio schedule at the beginning of the month. Steves speaks with MTPR's Michael Marsolek about how travel can help you get out of your comfort zone, grow and better understand the world.

Mildred Groves is an unusual young woman. Gifted and cursed with the ability to see the future, Mildred runs away from home to take a secretary position at the Hanford Research Center in the early 1940s. Hanford, a massive construction camp on the banks of the Columbia River in remote South Central Washington, exists to test and manufacture a mysterious product that will aid the war effort. Only the top generals and scientists know that this product is processed plutonium, for use in the first atomic bombs.

Freshwater diatom seen under a scanning electron microscope.
Courtesy UM Electron Microscopy Facility

The bottom of this shallow stream is covered with a complex community of algae, comprising many different species. Probably most abundant of all are the diatoms, many of which secrete a slippery mucus as they travel, leaving the rocks very slick.

Glorious Green Pesto Is Simple To Make

Sep 1, 2019
Elise Roedenbeck (CC-BY-NC-2.0)

Pesto is a gooey, thick, grey-green Genoese sauce composed of basil, olive oil, garlic, pine nuts and cheese whose name comes from pestâ, the Genoese word for "pounded." Its strong flavor can pleasantly mask (or crush) the mild flavors of accompanyments like pasta, chicken, salmon and poached eggs. Pesto is easy to make in a food processor, even though Genoans recommend using a mortar and pestle. It's well-suited for summer, when fresh basil is almost as ubiquitous as zucchini.

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