MTPR

Arts & Culture

Author interviews, food, natural history, poetry, and more from "The Write Question", "The Food Guys", "Field Notes", "Home Ground Radio", "Front Row Center", and "Reflections West".

Theresa Burkhart

Award-winning professor and author, Rita Sommers-Flanagan has written a book that will charm, irritate, amuse, and engage readers. It will also change minds and lives. This novel provides an entertaining and excellent read for book clubs, families, and everyone contemplating the meaning of life.

Root Vegetable Ideas That'll Butter Your Parsnips

Feb 17, 2019
Flickr user, Amber DeGrace (CC-BY-2.0)

The Food Guys, Jon and Greg, remain undaunted champions of parsnips, a vegetable that suffers from its resemblance to an anemic carrot.  Jon reminisces about the sweet and flavorful parsnips his gardener father kept buried in a box of soil in the root cellar. "Their taste approached the mythic sweetness of mature parsnips left in the ground all winter."

In the summer of 1955, sixteen-year-old Tommy Cadigan finds himself helpless in the face of desire, especially when the man that wears the face is his high school swimming coach, a young Korean War veteran who is still recovering from receiving a “blue ticket” discharging him from the military because of his homosexuality. Unsure if his infatuation is returned, Tommy distracts himself with the attention of a local bully, who hustles older men at night besides a decrepit zoo in Boise’s park. Tommy soon finds himself in the midst of a scandal that threatens to ignite the entire town…and his life will never be the same.

Even horses cough!
MaxPixels (Creative Commons) / MaxPixels

Hi! I’m Dr. Jamison Starbuck, a naturopathic family physician. I’m here today with health tips for kids about coughing.

Cough-cough-cough.

The Virtues Of Bone Broth: What's Old Is New Again

Feb 10, 2019
Flickr user, Blue Lotus (CC-BY-2.0)

Among a certain group of food lovers, bone broth is enjoying its moment of hip, but as Food Guys Jon Jackson and Greg Patent point out, slow-cooked, mineral-rich meat stock never went out of style.  19th-century cookbooks always included a section in the back for food as medicine, with recipes for chicken soup and 'beef tea.'

Can Do: Helping Take Start-Ups To The Next Level

Feb 8, 2019
Will Price, founder of Next Frontier Capital in Bozeman, Montana.
Next Frontier Capital

Will Price’s motivation for founding Bozeman, Montana-based Next Frontier Capital in 2015 is deep-seated: he’s a member of an extended Montana family, and like many, work early in his career sent him far away from the state. By giving tech start-ups the capital they need to stay and create jobs for the next generation of Montanans, Price’s goal is nothing short of a reversal of the Treasure State’s historic brain-drain.

Bug Bytes: Spider Silk

Feb 5, 2019
Orb weaver spider.
Missoula Insectarium

Thanks to the children’s novel Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White, most of us are familiar with the circular shape of an orb weaver spider web. Charlotte certainly had no trouble creating a new web overnight, but it might be more complicated than you think.

Bug Bytes: Mosquitoes

Feb 5, 2019
Mosquito.
PD

Imagine enjoying beautiful summer evenings without the nuisance of mosquitoes.

Humans and other animals know mosquitoes as annoying, buzzing bloodsuckers. Well, at least female mosquitoes are. Only female mosquitoes suck blood, which they need to provision their eggs with essential amino acids.

Bug Bytes: Mourning Cloak Butterfly

Feb 5, 2019
Mourning cloak butterfly.
Missoula Insectarium

If you live in our northern states, some years spring can’t come soon enough. Seeing your first butterfly of the year must be a sure sign that spring has sprung — unless it’s a mourning cloak butterfly.

Mourning cloaks are a type of tortoiseshell butterfly. Along with a handful of butterflies known as anglewings, tortoiseshells are the first butterflies we see flying in late winter or early spring.

Bug Bytes: Antlions

Feb 5, 2019
Antlion.
Missoula Insectarium

If you’re a Star Wars fan, they may remind you of the Sarlacc and its deadly sand pit in the "Return of the Jedi."

In their adult life stage, antlions are pretty innocent. With long, slender abdomens and two pairs of translucent wings, they resemble dragonflies or damselflies and mostly feed on nectar and pollen.

Pages