MTPR

Anaconda Montana

The Washoe Smelter Stack in Anaconda.
Nora Saks / Montana Public Radio

Anaconda residents are one step closer to finding out more details about the final Superfund cleanup deal and plan that’s been under wraps for the last four months.

The Pittsmont Dump at Montana Resources' mine in Butte is the "final resting place" for the Parrot Tailings. September 2018.
Nora Saks / MTPR

A new study on human health risks associated with mining recently made waves in Butte, and on Thursday the author is giving a talk at Montana Tech to discuss her findings with the public.

Kathleen Williams chats with Anaconda constituents at a "meet-and-greet" on October 15, 2018.
Nora Saks

On Monday afternoon, Democratic Congressional hopeful Kathleen Williams greeted a group of about 30 supporters gathered in the basement of Donivan’s Restaurant in downtown Anaconda.

“Hi everyone. People are voting! Isn’t that cool? This is exciting," said Williams.

Cathy Price retired to Anaconda ten years ago, and decided to get tested for lead and arsenic. September 14, 2018.
Nora Saks

Over the weekend, the federal agency that investigates human health risks at Superfund sites offered free lead and arsenic testing in Anaconda. They collected blood and urine samples from two hundred willing locals. The tests will reveal if they’ve recently been exposed to dangerous amounts of heavy metals, and how.

David Dorian, an environmental health specialist with ATSDR, discusses a new exposure investigation at a public meeting at Anaconda High School. July 11, 2018.
Nora Saks

The federal agency that investigates health risks at Superfund sites is in Anaconda this coming weekend offering free arsenic and lead testing to the first 200 people to sign up.

Results from this study could influence the final cleanup deal currently being negotiated for the Anaconda Smelter Superfund site.

EPA Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler outside Anaconda, Sept. 7, 2018. Behind him, L to R: Anaconda-Deer Lodge County Superfund Coordinator Carl Nyman, MT A.G. Tim Fox, EPA Regional Adm. Doug Benevento, County CEO Bill Everett, Sen. Steve Daines
Eric Whitney

"I’m very happy to be here. This is a historic occasion," U.S. Senator Steve Daines said at a press conference in Butte Friday morning.

He was introducing the head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, who, at his invitation, was visiting Superfund sites in Butte and Anaconda. The last time the top boss of the EPA did that was 28 years earlier.

L to R, Butte Superfund Activist Fritz Dailey, US Senator Steve Daines and Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler at the confluence of Blacktail and Silver Bow Creeks in Butte, September 7, 2018.
Eric Whitney / Montana Public Radio

The head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency visited the Superfund sites in Butte and Anaconda Friday. The last time the head of the agency did so was 28 years ago.

Andrew Wheeler was named acting administrator of the EPA in July, following the departure of Scott Pruitt amid ethics scandals.

Anaconda copper smelter.
Keith Ewing (CC-BY-NC-2) / Flickr

A federal agency is offering free testing for lead in blood and arsenic in urine for Anaconda residents next weekend.

A century of copper smelting left soils in the Anaconda area contaminated with heavy metals, so researchers are asking: “Are exposures to arsenic and lead at levels currently that could adversely affect people’s health?”

Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler.
Montana Department of Labor and Industry

The Chief of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will be in Butte and Anaconda Friday, Senator Steve Daines announced Tuesday.  

Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler will tour Superfund sites and meet with local leaders and community members in the Mining and Smelter cities.

Corin Cates-Carney

State budget director Dan Villa will leave that position in about five weeks to become the next executive director of the Montana Board of Investments.

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