Montana Public Radio

Rachel Cramer

Reporter

Rachel Cramer is a reporter for Yellowstone Public Radio

Greg Gianforte speaks to supporters in an open-air tent outside Hilton Garden Inn in Bozeman, shortly after the AP called the governor's race in his favor, Nov. 03, 2020.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio

Greg Gianforte will be Montana’s first Republican governor in 16 years. The Associated Press called the race Tuesday night.

People vote in person at the Gallatin County Fairgrounds in Bozeman on election day, Nov. 03, 2020.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

In Gallatin County, where 82 percent of absentee ballots had been returned by mid-morning, around 75 people stood in line at the fairgrounds a few hours after the polls opened. Volunteers in green vests asked people from different households to stay six feet apart, which was marked by orange cones.

Yellowstone Public Radio's Rachel Cramer spoke with several people after they cast their ballots. 

Missoula County Tuesday announced a health order that reduces the number of people allowed to gather for events and in some businesses in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. 

Starting Thursday at 8 am, events and gatherings in Missoula will be limited to 25 people. That includes parties and receptions, meetings, farmers markets, concerts, sporting events, organized youth activities.

Talking about Montana's environment, our public lands and waterways, is one of the fastest ways for politicians to gain credibility here. After all, about a third of the land in this state belongs to you and me. Big, sprawling swaths of natural beauty are a defining feature of Montana. So much so, the preamble to the Constitution goes on at length about the state's landscape. The quiet beauty of our state. The grandeur of our mountains. The vastness of our rolling plains.

But when politicians talk about protecting our outdoor heritage in Montana, what exactly are they protecting and whose interests are they serving?

The critical fire weather and poor air quality across much of Montana will last at least until the end of the week.

Almost half of the state’s air monitoring stations bounced between "Unhealthy" and "Moderate" air quality readings Monday afternoon


Montana’s land board will vote on July 20 on a proposed addition to a wildlife management area near Anaconda. State biologists, a local rod and gun club and several conservation groups say making the section of private land public would protect key wildlife habitat from subdivisions and improve access for recreationists.

Yellowstone National Park said July 15 officials recently euthanized a black bear after it bit a backpacker and On July 6, a black bear walked up to a backcountry campsite near the Hellroaring Trailhead where a group of five were sitting outside their tents.

Yellowstone’s press release says the bear bit the woman on her arm and head and nipped a child before walking over to the group’s food, which was on the ground.

Gallatin County officials had planned to discuss mandating face coverings on July 14 but postponed the meeting after people seeking to give public comment refused to maintain physical distancing.

Health officials said the space for the in person- public meeting could accommodate around 100 people sitting in chairs spaced six feet apart, a measure intended to reduce the spread of COVID-19 and follow the state’s reopening guidelines.

The Gallatin City-County Health Department recently detected a toxic algae bloom in a privately-owned pond in Bozeman. It’s the first one in the county this year.

Gallatin County temporarily closed a pond at Sundance Springs Subdivision on July 10 after test results came back positive for algal toxins, which are released by certain types of algae after rapid growth followed by decay.

Yellowstone National Park said Monday it hosted over half a million visitors in June. That’s around one-third less than the same time in 2019.

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