Montana Public Radio

Rachel Cramer

Reporter

Rachel Cramer is a reporter for Yellowstone Public Radio

Some Montana lawmakers are applauding the U.S.-China trade agreement signed Jan. 15, saying it’s a big win for the state’s agricultural producers. Critics say a trade war with the world’s second largest economy should not have happened in the first place.


A Montana timber company on Jan. 13 announced indefinitely closing one of its two sawmills, citing chronic timber supply problems due to litigation. Economists say lawsuits are only partly to blame.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks this week released a document nearly eight years in the making that outlines how bison could be restored in the state as publicly managed wildlife. 

Two men pleaded guilty in December to trespassing on the cone of Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park. 

The Montana Supreme Court Wednesday in Helena heard oral arguments from a lawsuit challenging immigration detentions in Lincoln County. The decision at a later date will have broad implications for the policy and practice of sheriffs across the state. 

Limited access to therapists, cost and stigma around mental health can make it difficult for rural Montanans to get the care they need. Now, Bozeman researchers are testing and adapting a new online program that’s been shown to side-step those barriers and reduce depression and anxiety for adults.

 


The public comment period closes Monday, Jan. 6 at midnight, on proposals to address crowding and conflicts on the iconic Madison River in southwest Montana.

The new trade deal between the U.S. and Japan went into effect Wednesday. Montana’s Farm Bureau vice president says it will give the state’s farmers and ranchers more certainty and a competitive edge in the new decade.

 

As more extreme droughts and floods and other climate effects threaten food production and the survival of rural communities, there’s a debate about whether sustainable agriculture can be achieved through new federal policies or shifting markets. 

The Montana Department of Environmental Quality announced Thursday that the Lower Gallatin Watershed is its next priority basin. This means hundreds of thousands of dollars will become available to address pollution in over half of the watershed’s major streams and rivers.

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