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Wildfire, fire management and air quality news for western Montana and the Northern Rockies.

Montana Public Radio, UM College of Business win Regional Murrow Award For 'Fireline'

Murrow award winner logo

Montana Public Radio and UM's College of Business have been awarded a Regional Murrow Award for Fireline, a podcast about what wildfire means for the west, our planet and our way of life.

The Murrow awards are among the most respected awards given to journalists. Murrow Award winning stories put public interest above all else and embody the values, principles and standards set forth by Edward R. Murrow, a journalism pioneer who set the standards for the highest quality of broadcast journalism.

“Winning this Regional Murrow award is a tremendous honor," host Justin Angle says. "Our goal was to help people understand the complexity of wildfire: the effects of climate change, policy and practice, as well as leave listeners with tangible actions they can take to be a part of the solution.”

A grid of logos from individual Fireline episodes.

Fireline, a six-part series, examines the causes and consequences of the increasingly devastating wildfires burning in the U.S. It taps into the experience of firefighters on the ground, Salish and Kootenai tribal land managers bringing natural fire back to the landscape and climate scientists sounding the alarm about increasing wildfire risk.

Fireline was produced as a collaboration between the UM College of Business and Montana Public Radio. The podcast is hosted by Justin Angle, an associate professor at the UM College of Business. It was produced by Nick Mott of the Peabody Award-winning show Threshold, and Richest Hill, named one of The New Yorker's “must listen” podcasts of 2019. Victor Yvellez served as an editor and reporter for the show.

Fireline will now advance to the National Murrow Award competition.

Fireline probes the causes and consequences of the increasingly devastating wildfires burning in the U.S. It taps into the experience of firefighters, tribal land managers, climate scientists and more to understand how we got here and where we're going.