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Forecasters Warn Of Record-Breaking Heat Across Montana

High confidence exists that a prolonged period of high temperatures in the 90s to 110s (and low temps in the 50s and 60s) will exist through at least July 3 across the entire Northern Rockies.
National Weather Service
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High confidence exists that a prolonged period of high temperatures in the 90s to 110s (and low temps in the 50s and 60s) will exist through at least July 3 across the entire Northern Rockies.

Weather forecasters say it will be dangerously hot across the northern Rockies starting early next week through the Independence Day weekend and urge the public to protect both human and pet health. 

The National Weather Service says record-shattering heat is possible by Wednesday.

Daytime highs in north-central Idaho could range from 107 to 115 degrees. Western Montana won’t be far behind with temps from the upper 90s to 110 degrees. Montana east of the divide won’t escape the brutal heat, either.

A recent tweet from National Weather Service Missoula reads in part: “If you haven’t gotten the message by now, let this be your reminder: the heatwave set to impact Idaho and Montana is NOT your average summer heatwave.”

Dr. Judson Corn is a physician at Missoula’s Community Medical Center.

“Here in Montana, we're used to a different temperature most of the time, and our bodies have a tougher time adjusting to and compensating with higher temperatures,” Corn says.

He says thirst, excessive sweating and fatigue is the body’s way of saying it’s too warm and needs a break. Symptoms of heat illness include fatigue, muscle aches and cramps, nausea and vomiting. Signs of heat stroke include headache and confusion. That’s the most serious form of heat injury and can lead to heart, kidney, muscle and brain damage. 

“Prevention is key, just like all of medicine. Stay hydrated, [wear] light and loose-fitting clothing, wearing sun hats, long sleeves, long pants and then using lots of sunscreen as well when you’re out in the sun,” he says. 

Corn says those most at risk of heat injury include infants, the elderly and those with existing medical problems.

Active people are urged to exercise early in the morning or later at night to avoid the extreme afternoon heat.

Children and pets should never be left unattended in parked cars during hot summer days — even in those with open windows.

Corn says all the heat injury prevention guidance that applies to humans also applies to our pets.

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