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Inside MTPR

Find out what's happening with Montana Public Radio's DJ's, staff, and listeners.

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Celebrated on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving (in the U.S.) and the widely recognized shopping events Black Friday and Cyber Monday, #GivingTuesday kicks off the charitable season, when many focus on their holiday and end-of-year giving. Since its inaugural year in 2012, #GivingTuesday has become a movement that celebrates and supports giving and philanthropy with events throughout the year and a growing catalog of resources.

This year consider investing in community with a donation to Montana Public Radio. Your support helps power us forward into 2018!

For me, Thanksgiving was about family. We’d celebrate the holiday with a table full of food and family. We’d go around the table and ask each person what they were thankful for over the past year. Most of the time, it had to do with someone, family or otherwise, who had made a difference in our lives.

Again this year, we would like to say thanks to you. You are a very important part of our Montana Public Radio family.

On Tuesday, public broadcasting in America turns 50, and Montana Public Radio joins America in saluting this national treasure. In signing the Public Broadcasting Act in 1967, President Johnson expressed the hope that one day, public television and radio stations would satisfy "America’s appetite for excellence" and "enrich man’s spirit."

That legislation created the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which today supports nearly 1,500 public media stations across the country by distributing federal funding amounting to roughly $1.35 per citizen, per year. At MTPR, this investment is critical to our operations. Combined with listener donations, we leverage federal funding – many times over – to provide a welcoming space for childhood education and lifelong learning, the arts and culture, history, science, and civil discourse in Montana.

Montana Public Radio has released a new podcast spotlighting Montana’s entrepreneurial spirit.

"Can Do: Lessons From Savvy Montana Entrepreneurs” is a podcast all about why Montana leads the nation in entrepreneurship and business startups. From cricket farms to romance novels, “Can Do” shares the secrets to business success in Big Sky Country.

Thank you to everyone who donated or volunteered during our fall pledge week! Your support makes public radio possible. We raised about $160,000 toward our goal of $260,000 for the week.

Show your support for MTPR during our fall pledge week. Your donation helps support the Montana news, arts & culture and hand-picked music you love on Montana Public Radio. You can donate online now, or call 1-800-325-1565. Together we are Montana Public Radio.

MTPR Fall Pledge Week Starts October 18

Oct 11, 2017

MTPR's fall pledge week starts October 18. Your donation helps support the Montana news, arts & culture and hand-picked music you love on Montana Public Radio. You can donate online now, or call 1-800-325-1565.

Volunteers having fun while answering phones during pledge week.
Anne Hosler

Just a friendly reminder that Montana Public Radio's fall drive is coming up and not only do we look forward to spending time with you, but we also need your help! Sign up to volunteer.

Whether you are able to spend a few hours with us in the phone room, in the front office, or in the development office following the drive to thank our new members, it is all important work that we do together to keep MTPR going strong.

The new host of Montana Public Radio’s literary program can’t get her head out of the books. Luckily for Sarah Aronson, who was named host of “The Write Question” this summer, it’s what she loves to do.

“I’m thrilled to read new works,” Aronson said. “And I love that I get to have thoughtful conversations with the authors.”

(PD)

If you drive across the country tuned in to public radio stations along the way, you'll hear many of your favorite shows no matter where you are. Programs like "All Things Considered," "This American Life," and "Radiolab" are staples of public radio. But each local station also has its own flavor, reflecting the unique character of the communities it serves. That's why Montana Public Radio is one of the first places people call when their pet goes missing.

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