MTPR

wildlands

It’s been about a year since lightning started a fire that burned almost 4,500 acres in the Lee Metcalf Wilderness and Yellowstone National Park. Local fire managers and ecologists invited journalists to see how the burn site is recovering and learn how fire plays a role on the landscape.


For the first time in thirty years, the U.S. Forest Service is updating its management plan for the Custer-Gallatin National Forest. It’ll determine where you can mountain bike, build new trails and harvest timber, among other things.

A state judge has revoked the water permit for a silver and copper mine proposed beneath a northwestern Montana wilderness area.

Judge Kathy Seeley said in a recent order that state officials did not adequately consider potential damage to nearby streams from Hecla Mining Company’s Rock Creek Mine.

A firefighter stands in front of flames from a wildfire.
(PD)

Scientists at the University of Montana have found that climate change is already reducing the ability of some forests in the western U.S. to bounce back after wildfire. Their findings are confirming a long-suspected change.

For the past three years, UM post-doc Kimberly Davis has looked at how ponderosa pine and Douglas fir forests regenerate after fire, and she’s made an eye-opening discovery.

North Shore Wildlife Management Area.
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is accepting public comment on a proposed management plan for wildlife habitat along the north shore of Flathead Lake south of Kalispell.

This would be the first management plan for the agency’s 400 acre North Shore Wildlife Management Area, which serves as a migratory stopover point for some 200 bird species. The agency acquired the land in three phases between 2008 and 2016.

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