Montana Public Radio

Olivia Reingold

Olivia Reingold is the Tribal Issues Correspondent for Yellowstone Public Radio. She was previously a producer for Georgia Public Broadcasting and participated in the NPR program, “Next Generation Radio.” She graduated from Columbia Journalism School, where she reported on opioids and the 12-step recovery program, Narcotics Anonymous. She’s from Washington D.C. and is particularly interested in covering addiction. She likes to sew, just don’t ask her to follow a pattern.

 

The Montana Missing Idigenous Persons Task Force hosted a public meeting in Billings Feb. 6. Some community members pressed for Native people to form a task force of their own.


A new federal task force formed to address high rates of missing and murdered indigenous people met in Washington, D.C. for the first time Jan. 29.

A recent Montana case highlights its limitations.

The sheriff leading an investigation into a 16-year-old Crow girl’s disappearance and death has requested assistance from the state Division of Criminal Investigation.


This weekend, the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians celebrated something generations have fought for and that 400 other U.S. tribes are without: federal recognition.

Update Jan. 23, 2020:  A preliminary autopsy report released Thursday says Selena Not Afraid died of hypothermia. Montana's chief medical examiner at the state crime lab in Billings also found there were no wounds, broken bones or other signs of violence on her body. A toxicology report has not yet been completed and could take several weeks. The following story was published before the autopsy report was released.

Law enforcement and family members are clashing over what they say killed a 16-year-old Crow girl, who was found dead near an Interstate-90 rest stop earlier this week.

The body of a 16-year-old Crow girl missing since New Years Day has been found near where she disappeared at an Interstate-90 rest area outside of Billings.


Multiple agencies are continuing to search for a missing girl from south-central Montana through frigid weather.

 

Montana’s Secretary of State is facing heat online for writing a newsletter that compares the Israeli-Palestinian conflict to U.S.-tribal relations.

 

Montana’s Missing Indigenous Persons Task Force is extending the deadline for tribal colleges to apply for a grant to start a missing persons database. That’s after no one applied the first time around.


The Crow Legislature had a vote that had tribal members on the edge of their seats last week. They were voting to decide who was going to manage the tribe’s multimillion dollar accounts that resulted from a federal water rights settlement: First Interstate Bank in Billings or a financial advisor from New York City?

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