Montana Public Radio

Scott Sales

 

The Montana Secretary of State oversees elections and election laws, maintains records on legislation and business filings, and serves on the state Board of Land Commissioners, among other duties. Seven candidates are vying for the position in the primary election.

Scott Sales
Courtesy

Montana Public Radio is gathering information on all statewide primary candidates to publish as a resource for our audience. We asked all the statewide candidates to respond to the following questions via email, limiting their answers to 300 words per question. These are their unedited responses.

Secretary of State candidate Scott Sales:

Montana Secretary of State Office
William Marcus

A fourth Republican is entering Montana’s primary race for Secretary of State.

Bowen Greenwood, current clerk of the Montana Supreme Court, announced Tuesday he’s joining the 2020 race for the job of top election official.

Debra Lamm's photo from the 2015 Montana Legislature website
leg.me.gov

  

A former head of the Montana Republican party is entering the 2020 race for the state’s lone seat in the U.S House. 

Debra Lamm is now the fifth Republican in the party’s primary race for the House seat, which the GOP has held for more than two decades.


Candidates for statewide offices in Montana are gearing up for next year’s primaries. Republican State Senator Scott Sales announced in March he’s running for Secretary of State. He recently spoke with YPR News’ Jess Sheldahl about election security and his plans to develop communication with the County Clerks and Recorders.

Sen. Bryce Bennett.
Montana Legislature

Montana Democrats have their first candidate for the Secretary of State’s office race in 2020. Missoula State Sen. Bryce Bennett announced his bid for the office Wednesday.

Bennett declared his candidacy in a YouTube video released Wednesday morning.  

Sen. Duane Ankney (R) - Colstrip.
Mike Albans / Montana Public Radio

The bill to reauthorize Medicaid expansion in Montana failed to pass today when the state Senate locked in a 25-25 tie.

Republican co-sponsors of the policy are withholding their support in a play for leverage over other political goals, including the passage of a controversial bill aimed at keeping the coal-fired power plant in Colstrip running.

Montana State Capitol.
William Marcus / Montana Public Radio

The Montana Senate today unanimously supported a plan that political leaders are calling a breakthrough after years of debate on how to fund major state infrastructure projects.

On a 50-0 vote the Senate gave initial approval to the plan, which caps state bonding for future public works projects and lays out new rules for how that money is spent.

Tonight on Capitol Talk: The state's utility regulators endorse a bill that appears to weaken the their own regulatory oversight. The cost of Medicaid expansion — and a new revenue estimate — complicate the state budget outlook. The president of the Senate wants to be the top election official. And the mayor of Helena wants to run for governor or Congress, but he's not ready to say if he'll run as a Democrat or Republican.

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Montana's election administrators are asking lawmakers to allow them to open and begin counting absentee ballots earlier because the number of mailed-in ballots continues to increase.

The Senate has passed a bill that would allow absentee ballots to be opened starting on the Thursday before Election Day and for the counting of absentee ballots to start the Monday before Election Day.

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