MTPR

Jess Sheldahl

Jess Sheldahl is a reporter and host for Morning Edition at Yellowstone Public Radio. She fell in love with public radio after becoming a DJ at the University of Montana’s college station KBGA. Since then, she’s worked at MTPR and graduated with a BA in Journalism from the University of Montana. Born and raised in Montana, Jess understands the importance of reporting on local news and issues that matter to the people who live here. She also enjoys a cold beer and a good book under the Big Sky.

 

A former Helena elementary school teacher and husband of Democratic state superintendent of public instruction candidate Melissa Romano is facing a felony drug charge. The charges were filed Tuesday. 


The Billings Gazette laid off three people from their newsroom earlier this month. The latest string of cutbacks in Billings mirror widespread newsroom layoffs in Montana and across the nation.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is offering a reward for information about four trophy mule deer bucks poached north of Hardin. This is the the most recent in a string of poaching cases in southern Montana.

Montana State University Billings released the 32nd edition of its political poll Wednesday. The poll shows a majority of Montanans and Wyomingites support President Donald Trump and disapprove of Congress.


The Bureau of Land Management last week announced an increase to drilling permit fees on public lands. The fee increases directed by the U.S. Congress also apply to some mineral cost recovery for oil and gas developers.

It's Monday, October 7th. Today we have stories about U.S. Interior Secretary David Bernhardts' visit to the Rocky Mountain Front, oil and gas leases and a report from a clean energy rally in Billings.

A recent report from a pair of environmental advocacy groups says a third of the public lands leased for oil and gas development came with a price tag of $2 per acre or less.

Police car.
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Billings experienced a 75% increase in violent crime from 2012 to 2017.

That increase prompted the Billings Chamber of Commerce to focus on public safety during its annual meeting Tuesday.

The Billings Chamber advocated for better building design as a way to reduce costly crimes of opportunity like robbery or graffiti.

Mark Johnson is one of three people in Montana and Wyoming certified by the National Institute of Crime Prevention in Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design practices.


A U.S. government watchdog agency that works for Congress says taxpayers could potentially face hundreds of millions of dollars in cleanup costs from abandoned oil and gas wells on public lands.

 

Many are calling for the fast resolution to the Trump Administration's trade war with China. Among them are Montana cattle producers who see opportunity in Chinese markets.

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