MTPR

Ashley Loring Heavyrunner

Malinda Limberhand talks about the search for her daughter Hanna, during a Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Tribunal, Oct. 4, 2019.
Aaron Bolton / Montana Public Radio

Native advocates and the Blackfeet Nation late last week held what is being called the first-ever Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Tribunal in the U.S. The testimony from the families of missing and murdered Native people will be delivered to Congressional lawmakers in a push for policy change. Most family members focused on their frustrations with law enforcement.

A sign from a Jan. 9, 2019 missing and murdered Indigenous women vigil in Missoula.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

Human remains found last year on northwestern Montana’s Blackfeet Indian Reservation do not belong to a 20-year-old woman missing for almost two years.

The FBI Laboratory in Quantico, Virginia announced Friday that its analysis of the remains found December 13 are not those of Ashley Loring HeavyRunner who disappeared in June of 2017.

People carry signs and photographs of missing and murdered women and girls around UM's oval at the Native-led MMIW Vigil, Saturday, Janury 19, 2019.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

On Saturday, as Women’s Marches happened across the country, about 500 people turned out for an un-affiliated demonstration in Missoula: A vigil for missing and murdered indigenous women and girls.

Sign saying "Welcome to Blackfeet Indian Country."
Will Marlow (CC-BY-NC-2)


Federal agents say human remains have been found on the Blackfeet Indian reservation in Northwestern Montana where a woman was reported missing last year.

Kimberly Loring HeavyRunner testifies about missing and murdered indigenous women during a U.S. Senate committee hearing, December 12, 2018.
Courtesy Sen. Tester's office.

Three Indigenous women testified at the U.S. Capitol Wednesday to share stories of personal loss and profound frustration with a legal system that they say has essentially abandoned them.

This handout was given to the State-Tribal Relations Committee, March 30, 2018. Annita Lucchesi, a doctoral student at Lethbridge University, in the Canadian province of Alberta, says native women make up 30 percent of missing persons in the state.
Corin Cates-Carney / MTPR

Hundreds of Indigenous women go missing under suspicious circumstance every year in North America. A U.S. Senate Committee takes a closer look at the issue Wednesday.

The Senate Indian Affairs Committee may hear startling statistics like this one during its hearing: Native Americans make up about 7 percent of Montana’s population. But according to Montana’s Native American Domestic Violence Review Commission, Native people are involved in 16 percent of all of the state’s intimate partner homicides.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has officially joined the search for a missing Blackfeet woman last seen in Browning last June.