MTPR

Aaron Wernham


  Montana received almost $4 million in federal funds for addiction recovery and treatment this week.

Graph showing the percentage of survey respondents who reported improved access to healthcare due to Medicaid expansion in Montana.
Montana Healthcare Foundation

A new survey suggests Montanans who enrolled in the state’s Medicaid expansion program are healthier, less likely to put off treatment and more able to access mental health and substance abuse care.

Forty-three percent of those who responded to the nonprofit Montana Healthcare Foundation’s survey said their general health has improved since joining the program. Nearly 70 percent reported improved access to medical care.

Gavel.
(PD)

When the roughly 10 percent of adult Montanans with a substance-use disorder commit a crime, the state lacks enough drug courts to help them stay out of incarceration and navigate treatment. That’s according to a new report on Montana treatment courts released Thursday.

Most, about 90 percent, of those Montanas with a substance-use disorder aren’t receiving treatment for their illness.

The Montana Healthcare Foundation has pledged $1.2 million to help pregnant women receive addiction and behavioral health treatment.
Montana Healthcare Foundation

Pregnant women in Montana should have a lot easier time getting help for addiction and mental health problems if $5 million in grant funding announced Monday works as intended.

Most of the money is coming from the federal government, but at least $1.2 million has been pledged by the Montana Healthcare Foundation.

The percentages of Americans and Montanans without health insurance 2009-2016
Montana Healthcare Foundation

A report being released today says Montana’s uninsured rate is staying steady at about half of what it was before Medicaid expansion started in 2016. It says just under eight percent of Montanans now lack health insurance.

And, one of the studies outlines what it says are clear benefits to the state as voters and state lawmakers are considering whether to end Medicaid expansion.

Morphine pills.
Eric Norris (CC-BY-2) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

The Trump administration this week released almost $500 million to combat the nation’s opioid crisis. 

Montana’s share of that federal funding from Health and Human Services is $2 million, the same amount it received last year.

Medicaid expansion in Montana is expected to cost the state more than $58 million annually in a couple of years. But, a new economic analysis says the healthcare program in on track to pay for itself by then through savings in other parts of the state budget and increased economic activity.