MTPR

White Sulphur Springs Montana

Violinist and vocalist Suzanne Santo of HoneyHoney performing at Red Ants Pants in 2018.
Clare Menahan

The Red Ants Pants Music Festival typically falls on the hottest weekend in July in Montana. Attendees are encouraged to provide their own shade in the form of bandanas, ten gallon hats and baseball caps. Now in its ninth year, this weekend’s festival is shaping up to be no different.

Thousands will descend upon the picturesque town of White Sulphur Springs starting Thursday, July 25 to delight in the parade of colorfully embroidered cowboy boots and the voices of some of today’s best country and americana artists.

Ron Burns was among a half dozen people to speak in support of the Black Butte Copper Project during a public meeting in White Sulphur Springs April 30, 2019.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

Around 60 people sat on the bleachers of the White Sulphur Springs high school gym Tuesday night, 15 miles south of where a proposed underground mine could remove more than 14 million of tons of copper-enriched rock from the earth.

The meeting was the last of three for public input on the state’s draft environmental impact statement on the controversial Black Butte Mining Project, located on private land near the Little Belt Mountains.

Map showing the location of the proposed Black Butte Mine in Montana.
Montana DEQ

The proposed Black Butte copper mine outside White Sulphur Springs is the topic of two public meetings coming up Monday and Tuesday.

Monday evening’s meeting is at Park High School in Livingston. On Tuesday it’s at White Sulphur Springs High. Both meetings start at 6 p.m.

(PD)

Meagher County Commissioners signed an emergency declaration this afternoon due to a power outage that began this morning. County residents, like those in the town of White Sulphur Springs, have been without power since around 8 a.m.

Belt Creek, in the Little Belt Mountains, Helena-Lewis and Clark National Forest
Eric Whitney

The Helena-Lewis and Clark National Forest is hosting their annual open house next week in White Sulphur Springs.

"It’s mainly just to invite the public in to talk about projects that we’ve been working on over the years, but also projects that we have planned field work going on this upcoming summer," Kathy Bushnell, a spokesperson for the Forest says. 

Helena National Forest
Forest Service Northern Region (PD)

The first in a series of nine public meetings on a re-write of the forest plan for the Helena-Lewis and Clark National Forest happens tonight in Lincoln. Forest plans provide land managers with important long-term guidance, goals and standards. Think of them as legally-mandated land and resource mission statements for our national forests.

For centuries, durable work clothes have been designed for men, but Sarah Calhoun, founder and owner of Red Ants Pants, is working to change that. This week on "Home Ground", we learn how White Sulfur Springs became the international headquarters of the first company dedicated to work-wear for women. It's also the home of the annual Red Ants Pants Music Festival, an event that supports rural families and communities across the state. 

A Sultry, Contagious, Montana Style Celebration

Aug 1, 2016
Lead singer Molly Rose from Underhill Rose on Saturday, July 30
Mara Silvers

It’s not easy to dodge swing dancers, listen to your third favorite band of the day, admire the red ant temporary tattoos, and still hold onto your beer. But this, and so much more, is what the Red Ants Pants 2016  Music Festival requires of its attendees. Through the 90 degree heat and layers of dirt, the festival was a contagious and sultry celebration, Montana style.

Alan Kirk, mine permitting manager, and Bob Jacko, vice president of operations for Tintina show plans for the Black Butte Mine in July 2015.
Steve Jess

About 50 miles east of Helena, in White Sulphur Springs, residents are weighing the benefits that a new copper mine could bring to their community: about 200 new jobs along with millions of dollars to spur business growth. Opponents of the mine say Montana risks losing something even more valuable, one of its last unspoiled rivers.