MTPR

Rich Janssen

Vanessa Fields, planning team leader for the National Bison Range, presenting at the public meeting in Polson May 1, 2019.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio


The latest step in a years-long process laying out the future of the National Bison Range Monday night dredged up questions of race and public land ownership that have lingered since a failed 2016 proposal to transfer the refuge to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. 

A sign at the National Bison Range in northwest Montana.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio


New possibilities for management of the National Bison Range north of Missoula are out, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is taking public comment on them at three meetings this week. 

Jill Smail is the lead negotiator for the Columbia River Treaty for the U.S. State Department.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio

U.S. and Canadian officials are holding closed door meetings Wednesday and Thursday in British Columbia on the Columbia River Treaty. Tribes across the Northwest hope the outcomes include their demands for a healthy environment. 

National Bison Range
USFWS (CC-BY-2)

There’s a public meeting in Pablo tonight about the proposed transfer of the National Bison Range to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes.

After more than 100 years of federal control, the lands of the National Bison Range may be returned to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes.
Amy Martin

After more than 100 years of federal control, the lands of the National Bison Range may be returned to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. Last week, the tribes released draft legislation that would transfer authority over the range from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to the CSKT.