Montana Public Radio

Mike Hopkins

Gov. Steve Bullock vetoed a bill Wednesday intended to protect free and peaceful demonstrations in all public outdoor places on college campuses.

Montana Capitol in Helena.
William Marcus / Montana Public Radio

A new proposal from House Republicans is calling for a scaled down version of Gov. Steve Bullock’s plan for the state to borrow money for public works projects.

Bullock’s infrastructure plan released early in the session called for $160 million in state bonding.

That money would fund $44 million in local assistance grants. It would also and pay for additional water and wastewater grants through the treasure state endowment program, funded through coal severance tax.

'Capitol Talk' is MTPR's weekly legislative analysis program.
Montana Public Radio

Tonight on Capitol Talk: The state admits it needs to do a lot better job monitoring for-profit wilderness schools for troubled teens. Economics hold little sway in the effort to abolish Montana's death penalty. Money is being restored to the depleted Health Department budget. Another Montana campaign finance reform law is upheld. And lawmakers may have found a way to bridge the infrastructure impasse.

Montana Capitol.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio

The long running debate over executing state prisoners is again surfacing in the Montana legislature as two men sit, condemned to die, in Deer Lodge.

Poster in MT Gov office outlining some of the $290 million dollars in infrastructure projects Bullock is proposing. That proposal received initial votes and amendments Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019.
Corin Cates-Carney / MTPR

Gov. Steve Bullock’s plan for public works projects across the state advanced out of subcommittee review Thursday and the conservative majority is starting to pick it apart.

Republicans stripped out just over $17 million in proposed borrowing that Gov. Bullock’s bill laid out to pay for county and local government infrastructure projects.

Rep. Brad Hamlett, D-Cascade, wants to require prosecutors to provide indisputable biological proof that a person committed a capital crime before that person can be sentenced to death. File photo.
Montana Legislature

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — A Montana lawmaker wants to require prosecutors to provide indisputable biological proof that a person committed a capital crime before that person can be sentenced to death.

Montana Capitol in Helena.
William Marcus / Montana Public Radio

Montana senators have started the clock on the final day of the legislative session, forcing a 24-hour limit on the political chess match over funding long-term construction projects in the state like water treatment plants, a state veterans home, and schools.

"We’re going to turn the hourglass over and say you got one more day. Let’s get it done,” said Senate Minority Leader Jon Sesso.