MTPR

Kaiser Family Foundation

Montana Capitol building.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio

A day after the long-anticipated Republican plan to continue Medicaid expansion was revealed, House Democrats reacted with strong criticism.

"Frankly, right now, I don’t know what there is to negotiate about,” says Casey Schreiner, the Democratic House minority leader.

Montana didn’t have a vote on the healthcare bill that passed the U.S. House today. The state’s seat has been vacant since Ryan Zinke resigned it in March to become interior secretary.

Today the Greg Gianforte, Republican candidate to replace Zinke, talked to Montana Public Radio about the bill.

Medicare Turns 50 But Big Challenges Await

Jul 31, 2015
Harry Truman's application for Medicare
Courtesy of Truman Library

Medicare, the federal health insurance program for the elderly and disabled, has come a long way since its creation in 1965 when nearly half of all seniors were uninsured. Now, the program covers 55 million people, providing insurance to one in six Americans. With that in mind, Medicare faces a host of challenges in the decades to come. Here’s a look at some of them.

Five Challenges Facing Medicaid At 50

Jul 31, 2015
President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the bill creating Medicare and Medicaid at the library of former President Harry Truman, who was in attendance, on July 30, 1965.
Courtesy of Truman Library

A “sleeper” provision when Congress created Medicare in 1965 to cover health care for seniors, Medicaid now provides coverage to nearly one in four Americans, at an annual cost of more than $500 billion. Today, it is the workhorse of the U.S. health system, covering nearly half of all births, one-third of children and two-thirds of people in nursing homes.

Kaiser Family Foundation

Montana is doing a better job than most states at getting people signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act.

A new analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation shows that 45 percent of Montanans who are eligible to buy insurance had done so, as of February 15. Those eligible to buy insurance are generally anyone who doesn’t already have coverage through their job, a spouse or a government program like Medicare or Medicaid.

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