Montana Public Radio

Dan Thompson

Fish cooking over a campfire.
iStock

Wildlife managers across the region noted a drastic increase in the number of people recreating in bear country this year, but that spike didn’t lead to a bump in conflicts between humans and grizzlies. 

That's the takeaway from a year-end review of grizzly management in the Lower 48 states this week.

Following a record year of deaths for grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone, state and federal wildlife managers met in Bozeman this week to discuss efforts to reduce conflicts with humans. 

Grizzly bear in Yellowstone National Park.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Conservation groups alleged yesterday that Wyoming used part of Montana's grizzly bear hunting quota to increase its own allocation for a proposed hunt this year, even though Montana wildlife regulators voted not to give away any part of its quota.

Grizzly bear at Swan Lake Flats in Yellowstone National Park.
Jim Peaco (PD)

Most grizzly bears living near Yellowstone National Park are bedding down for winter, but the debate over the Trump administration removing Yellowstone grizzlies from the threatened species list earlier this year is not. De-listing is being challenged in court, and for now, the grizzlies are being managed by the states. 

Wyoming is considering a potential grizzly bear hunt, and its wildlife management agency is holding a series of meetings to get public input on that. As Yellowstone Public Radio’s Nate Hegyi found out at a meeting in Jackson, the public is divided.