Montana Public Radio

camping

Hole-in-the-Wall backcountry campground in Glacier National Park.
David Restivo - National Parks Service (PD)

Glacier National Park managers are implementing new lottery-based backcountry camping reservations intended to preserve the park’s overloaded internet system and campers’ chances at getting sites.

The new system will collect all campsite reservation requests placed opening day, this Friday, and process them in a randomly sequenced order.

Can Do: KOA, The Future Of Camping

Oct 5, 2018
Kampgrounds of America president Toby O’Rourke
Courtesy KOA

On this week’s episode of Can Do: Lessons from Savvy Montana Entrepreneurs, host Arnie Sherman talks with Kampgrounds of America President Toby O’Rourke, the first woman president in the company’s 56-year history.

Flathead National Forest Proposes Fee Increases

Oct 20, 2017
The Flathead National Forest is now taking comments on how it should manage the three forks of the Flathead River.
U.S. Forest Service

The Flathead National Forest is proposing an increase in fees for renting 12 cabins and lookouts and one campground. The proposal also includes a new fee for one campground.

Almost all of the money would go towards operating and maintaining local cabins and campgrounds. Public Affairs Officer for the forest Janette Turk said the forest needs to increase fees to pay for improvements like roads and daily patrols in campgrounds and new furniture and appliances in the cabins.

Hole-in-the-Wall Backcountry Campground, August 2005.
David Restivo-NPS (PD)

Glacier National Park has stopped issuing backcountry camping permits due to an expected increase in fire activity this weekend.

This weekend’s incoming cold front will likely usher in gusty winds and dry thunderstorms, which fire officials say could grow existing fires and start new ones across western Montana.

Bikes and a tent at a campground.
Flickr User Lily Monster (CC-BY-NC-2)

Today Montana State Parks announced plans to construct group bicycle campsites at four state parks in western Montana.

Stellar Scintillation, Or Why Stars Twinkle

Oct 14, 2015
Stars over camp
Josh Burnham (CC-BY-NC-ND-2)

I often return from camping trips with a sore neck. For a while, I couldn’t figure out what caused this ailment. “Maybe I slept on it weird,” I think to myself. Then I think back to my last trip into the wilderness, and remember specifically the cloudless, moonless nights. The inky black sky. The stars. The universe over my head.

Two Medicine Lake and Sinopah Mountain.
David Restivo, NPS (PD)

Glacier National Park is moving into its autumn schedule and preparing for winter as Park visitation is slowly declining into the fall.

Sunday was the last day cars could access Logan Pass from the east side of the park.

Glacier National Park Fee Increases Begin This Fall

Sep 15, 2015
Glacier National Park entrance sign.
Flickr user photommo (CC-BY-ND)

Glacier National Park is increasing entrance fees this fall. The fees will go up again in the spring, and some campgrounds will cost more in the spring, too.

Starting November 1, Glacier ups the price of a seven-day vehicle entrance fee by $5 to $20. Motorcycle fees will also go up $5.

The fees will go up again in May, to $30 per car and $25 per motorcycle.

In January the cost of an annual pass to Glacier will go up $10, to $45.

The Happy Campers

Jul 6, 2015
Al_HikesAZ

"Si jeunessa sav ait..."

Leaning into the truck,
grinning into the camera,
they camp out in their adolescence
and my front yard
with the insolent charm
of young colts,
sleek with knowing,
wobbly with experience.

The moment I shoot them
I know this is it:
for grace of limb,
studied slouch
the matching dew rags,
rakish hat I wish I could wear.

After the click
they come back to life as if
the magic just goes on.
The truck jolts into gear and,
with careless wave of hands,
they're gone.

Stream Access Primer

Jul 11, 2014
Man fishing in the Yellowstone River.
Flickr user: Mirrur Image (CC-BY-NC)

Now that the rivers have fallen, summer is heating up and recreationists are hitting the state’s streams and rivers in force, it’s not a bad time to review exactly what is legal and what isn’t regarding recreational access to the state’s waters. When the public hews to the law it better ensures that inevitable and tiresome attacks on Montana’s stream access laws by legislators, non-resident landowners and so-called free-market think tanks will continue to fail miserably.