MTPR

Americorps VISTA

Six panelists and three moderators at Montana Tech for the KBMF public forum on Superfund. L-R: Mary Kay Craig, David Hutchins, Eric Hassler, Rayelynn Brandl, Robert Pal, Daniel Hogan, Olivia Everett, Leif Clark. (Not pictured: Pat Cunneen)
Nora Saks / Montana Public Radio

For decades now, Superfund meetings have been routine in Butte, but their highly technical nature can deter locals who want to stay informed and involved. In response, KBMF- Butte’s community radio station, hosted its first ever Superfund forum last Friday night.

Missoulovation-team
Rebecca Rice

In America’s booming high tech economy, women are vastly underrepresented. Only four in 1,000 female college freshmen want to major in computer science, and 50% of women who are in science, technology, engineering, and  math careers leave the workforce.

An organization called Technovation is working to change those statistics. Google, Twitter, MIT, and others are backing Technovation’s technology entrepreneurship program and an annual competition for girls ages 10 through 18.

Montana produces more AmeriCorps volunteers than any other state. What's more, the federal agency that administers the service organization says more members come from Billings than other cities of its size.

Chances are, you’ve heard of AmeriCorps, the national service program started by President Clinton in 1993. But you might not have heard of Food Corps, an offshoot of AmeriCorps.

Food Corps volunteers work in local schools, teaching kids the value of healthy eating, drawing the connection between what’s in the soil and what’s on their lunch trays.

Jessica Manly of Kalispell is one of two Food Corps members who’ll be putting on a special half-day class called “Kids' University” at the Montana Organic Association’s annual conference, getting underway today in Great Falls.

Dan Boyce

    

Why would a group of young people  be collecting toiletries for the National Day of Service?

Well, the items collected by the Americorps VISTA volunteers go to veterans. VISTA volunteer Jessi Sheava sayssaid for vets going through hard times, some staying at the local homeless shelter, toiletries like toothpaste and shampoo may be luxury items.

"A lot of veterans here in Helena are looking for jobs, are eager to find work and the basics are needed to help them in their everyday life," she said.