MTPR

Rotenone

Westslope cutthroat trout.
Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

For the first time, Glacier National Park is attempting to eradicate non-native trout species and restore native westslope cutthroat trout. The project on the west side of the park specifically aims to preserve genetically pure westslope populations.

Hybridization between westslope cutthroat trout and non-native rainbow trout in Glacier National Park. Green = westslope cutthroat genes. Red = rainbow trout genes.
National Parks Service

Glacier National Park released an environmental assessment Friday for a proposal to kill off non-native fish in a remote area. Biologists say that could help fortify native species against the threats of climate change, invasive species and habitat loss.

Upper Gibbon River near Wolf Lake.
Yellowstone National Park (PD)

Starting next week Yellowstone National Park staff will begin chemically treating the upper Gibbon River, continuing a project to remove nonnative fish in central Yellowstone.

Katrin Frye

A large scale conservation project to restore genetically pure west slope cutthroat trout in northwest Montana nears the finish line. Three of 21 lakes remain for Fish, Wildlife and Parks to treat as part of the South Fork West Slope Cutthroat Trout Project.

Fisheries Biologist Matt Boyer said this September they’ll be working on Koessler Lake in the Bob Marshall Wilderness. This lake they’ll be treating with a poison called Rotenone and re-stocking with genetically pure West Slope Cutthroat Trout.