Montana Public Radio

migration

Eagle Watching At Rogers Pass, 2008

Nov 24, 2019
Golden eagle.
(PD)

As raptors at the top of their food chain, goldens are good indicators of the ecological health of a region. In recent years, studies show a population in decline. What does one do with this information?  This is one of the questions of science, and of birders: what are we really looking at?

Pronghorn antelope at the National Bison Range.
Josh Burnham (CC-BY-2)

A new federal grant will give scientists a closer peek into secrets held by southwestern Montana’s pronghorn antelope.

The Madison Valley supports one of southwest Montana’s largest wintering populations of pronghorn antelope.

Fall Migration Brings Golden Eagles To Montana

Oct 28, 2018
Golden eagle.
Flickr user Rocky (CC-BY-2)

I had been sitting in the observation blind for a couple of hours when I heard a commotion outside. Looking through the one-way glass, I saw an enormous bird with a golden crown and talons that were built for serious damage. Another landed nearby. I knew immediately that they were golden eagles, which are one of the largest predatory birds in North America.

Clay Scott

Pronghorn antelope make the second longest migration of any North American land animal. But their ancient migration routes are threatened by livestock fencing.

Flickr user, Sid Mosdell

When it comes to surviving winter, insects in temperate regions like Montana can be divided into two groups: freeze-tolerant insects that can survive if their body fluids freeze, and freeze-avoiding ones that can't.

Certain flies, wasps, beetles and moth and butterfly larvae and pupae produce chemicals that control the rate and size of ice crystal formation in their bodies, so that freezing doesn't damage their cells. The pupae of one species of swallowtail butterfly has survived laboratory temperatures of -385 degrees F.