MTPR

Lauren Small Rodriguez

Community members carry signs and photographs of missing and murdered women and girls around UM's oval at the Native-led MMIW Vigil, Saturday, Janury 19, 2019.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

On Saturday, as Women’s Marches happened across the country, about 500 people turned out for an un-affiliated demonstration in Missoula: A vigil for missing and murdered indigenous women and girls.

'Capitol Talk' is MTPR's weekly legislative analysis program.
Montana Public Radio

This week at the Capitol: There's new momentum this legislative session to end Montana's statute of limitations in child sex abuse cases; Gov. Bullock remains vague about his political aspirations; the U.S. Supreme Court leaves Montana's campaign contribution limits in place; direct care workers may get a raise; and rallies to focus attention on missing and murdered Indigenous women coincide with possible legislative action. Learn more now on Capitol Talk with Sally Mauk, Rob Saldin and Holly Michels.

Josh Burnham

A third annual Women’s March is happening Saturday in cities across the country. But events scheduled in Missoula and Kalispell are steering clear of the national march’s agenda.

Lauren Small Rodriguez is one of the organizers of an entirely Native-led vigil for missing and murdered indigenous women taking place Saturday in Missoula.

About 100 people gathered in a circle on the University of Montana campus Tuesday afternoonAbout 100 people gathered in a circle on the University of Montana campus in Missoula on the afternoon of Nov. 15 to protest  to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline.
Edward O'Brien

Demonstrators across the nation today rallied against the Dakota Access Pipeline. About 100 people gathered in a circle on the University of Montana campus Tuesday afternoon to protest.

"This is history right now. This is civil rights history repeating itself in 2016," says University of Montana senior Lauren Small Rodriguez, who just returned from North Dakota’s Standing Rock Reservation.