Montana Public Radio

COVID Science Series

The state tribal-relations committee recently wrote a letter urging the public to respect the closure orders on reservations across Montana, which have been slower to reopen than elsewhere in the state. But science research continues to flourish on tribal lands, despite COVID-19-slowdowns and uncertainty.

This story is part of our series looking at the impact of the novel coronavirus on science in Montana.

Caption: Madi Miller has been doing research from her kitchen since the COVID-19 pandemic closed her lab.
Courtesy Madi Miller

Since COVID-19 shut down research deemed “non-essential” across the state, Some scientists are now bringing their work home with them.

This story is part of our series looking at the impact of the novel coronavirus pandemic on science in Montana.

Kayla Ruth and Samantha Bundick look through binoculars in 2016 while doing research aimed at determining the species of songbirds they're observing on private lands in Eastern Montana.
Courtesy UM Avian Science Center

Scientists' spring and summer field seasons are being postponed, altered or cancelled completely in the face of COVID-19. Time sensitive research is the most vulnerable.

This story is another in our series looking at the impact of the novel coronavirus pandemic on scientific research efforts in Montana.

Adam Baumann is the only scientist working inside the University of Montana's Flathead Lake Biological Station lab. He's wearing a mask due to COVID-19 restrictions.
Sofia Stuart-rasi / Montana Public Radio

May 4, the University system in Montana started to slightly relax restrictions on research and lab work. But labs across the state continue to grapple with how to keep their experiments on course.

This is another story in our series looking at the impact of the novel coronavirus pandemic on science in Montana.

Postdoctoral researcher Anna Nemudraia works with wastewater samples in Blake Wiedenheft’s lab at Montana State University.
Courtesy Anna Nemudraia

While some research is plagued by uncertainty and has ground to a halt, COVID-19 has fast-tracked other innovative experiments and spawned new collaborations.

This is the first in a series looking at the push and pull of the novel coronavirus pandemic on science in Montana.