MTPR

Cloud Peak Energy

Judge: US Must Reconsider Climate Impacts Of Montana Mine

Feb 12, 2019
Coal train
(PD)

BILLLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. officials have again been faulted by a federal judge for failing to adequately consider the potential climate change effects of expanding a massive coal mine in the sagebrush-covered hills of southeastern Montana.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Timothy Cavan recommended in a Monday ruling that the Interior Department be given 240 days to re-analyze the expansion.

Coal from the Montana side of the Powder River Basin will soon be headed to Japan for two new state-of-the-art coal gasification plants in the Fukushima Prefecture. Cloud Peak Energy announced an agreement with Singapore-based JERA Trading to supply coal for up to 40 months beginning at the end of next year.

The Spring Creek Mine near Decker, Montana
Google maps

Montana timber companies are happy that President Trump has slapped new import taxes on Canadian forest products, but backlash is hurting a coal company here.

On Wednesday the premier of British Columbia asked Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to retaliate against the timber tariffs by shutting down U.S. access to a seaport in Vancouver. That letter caused the stock price of Cloud Peak Energy to drop by 10 percent yesterday.

US: Coal Mine Expansion To Have Minor Climate Impact

Oct 6, 2016
A federal judge in Great Falls Friday said the Trump administration failed to consider the environmental effects of its decision to resume coal sales from federal lands that the Obama administration stopped.
USDA NRCS

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. officials approved a 117 million-ton expansion of a Montana coal mine after concluding that burning the fuel would have a minor impact on the nation's overall greenhouse gas emissions, according to documents released Thursday.

An Uneven Exchange: Coal Miners Versus Coal Consumers

May 23, 2016
A Coal Mine in the Powder River basin.
U.S. Geological Survey

There’s a polarized debate going on in this country about the future of fossil fuels — specifically coal. As a country, we are using less and less coal, but we still burn hundreds of million of tons of it each year for electricity. And so beneath that debate is a real disconnect between the people who produce coal, and those who consume it. The debate and the divide were very much on display recently at a public event in Casper, Wyoming. Inside Energy’s Leigh Paterson reports.

Environmentalists, lawmakers, coal miners, and advocates of all types gathered to have their say at the meeting, hosted by the Department of the Interior.

Taylor Swift, Amy Martin tells us, is like coal buried beneath Montana.
Flickr User Larry Darling (CC-BY-NC-2)

Accounting is not sexy. So let’s start with two people who are — Ryan Adams and Taylor Swift.

This fall, Ryan Adams released an entire album of Taylor Swift songs. He called it 1989 – just like she did. In exchange for using Swift’s property — her songs — Adams has to pay her a portion of whatever money he makes from selling that recording. That’s known as a “royalty.”

Montana's Governor and a dozen business representatives from here are wrapping up a four-day trade mission to Taiwan and South Korea Friday. They're coming home to some bad news: the state's coal exports to Asia are being cut back.

Crow Tribe Says Coal Development Crucial To Survival

Oct 23, 2015
Montana Activists Rally Against Coal Trains
Flickr user Erin Kinney (CC-BY-NC-ND-2)

In south-central Montana, plans are underway to get more coal out of the ground and onto ships headed to Asia. The Crow Tribe and Cloud Peak Energy of Wyoming are partnering to develop a new coal mine on the reservation and to open a new export terminal in Washington’s Puget Sound. Although coal prices are in decline and a protest movement is growing, the Crow are undeterred. For them, coal equals survival.

Montana Capitol, Helena, MT.
William Marcus / Montana Public Radio

It was a rare event Thursday at the Montana capitol: A public hearing brought together a panel of state lawmakers and an audience packed with coal and electric industry representatives, yet very few people had anything to say. Even the group’s chairman, Butte Democratic Senator Jim Keane, found it odd:

Voices For, Against Coal Royalty Reform Heard In Billings

Aug 12, 2015
Commenters line up to speak during a Billings meeting on coal royalty reforms, Tuesday, August 11.
Jackie Yamanaka - Yellowstone Public Radio

An overflow crowd packed the Montana/Dakota’s BLM state office in Billings to speak on the federal coal program Tuesday. The agency is seeking comment on possible changes to make sure it’s obtaining the full economic value for the mining of federal coal. Comments ranged from whether the government is getting enough revenue, to climate change, to the "war on coal."

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