MTPR

Rachel Cramer

Reporter

Rachel Cramer is a reporter for Yellowstone Public Radio

Several hundred people attended a ground blessing ceremony last Friday for the new American Indian Hall at Montana State University in Bozeman.

The Southwestern Crown Collaborative visits a burn site from the Rice Ridge Fire near Seeley Lake.
Brittany Greeson, Crossing The Divide

Wildfires burned more than a million acres across Montana this year, making it one of the most expensive fire seasons since 1999. While the smoke has cleared, the debate over wildfires and forest management is ongoing. Some Montana lawmakers are blaming what they call "environmental extremists" who've managed to stop some logging. But ecologists say it's more complicated than that. In an effort to learn how to live with wildfires, the Southwestern Crown Collaborative is one group trying to find common ground.

David Maslanka.
Sue Rissberger Photography (www.suerissberger.com)

World-renowned composer David Maslanka died Sunday evening at his home in Missoula. During his career, Maslanka composed over 150 musical works, including 50 pieces for wind ensemble, eight symphonies and 17 concertos.

Aswan, the co-owner of Anne's Bakery in Missoula, removes khubz from their tandoor oven.
Rachel Cramer

Earlier this month, Iraq's prime minister, Haider al-Abadi, declared victory over Islamic State — or ISIS — in the city of Mosul after nine months of urban warfare. Almost one million people from Mosul have been displaced.

A brother and sister who fled that city and settled in Missoula four years ago are adapting to life as Americans. They’re making a living selling Iraqi flatbread in Montana, and marketing it to fit American tastes.

Jade Johnson at work in a UM chemistry lab.
Courtesy Matt Roberts

While Native Americans may be underrepresented in the "hard sciences," Jade Johnson would argue that now, more than ever, Native scientists are needed to make sure environmental issues don’t get swept under the rug or forgotten.

Johnson, a member of Navajo Nation, is an undergraduate chemistry student at San Diego State University. This summer, she’s doing research at the University of Montana. It’s not the first time she’s done something like this.

Taif Salam and Carez Zozik are two of the 25 students participating in the Iraqi Young Leaders Program at UM.
Rachel Cramer

A group of 25 college students from Iraq is visiting Missoula. They arrived on July 10,  just as Iraqi forces were reclaiming the city of Mosul from Islamic State, also known as ISIS.

The students are part of an exchange of Iraqi Young Leaders arranged by the U.S. State Department and the University of Montana with a focus on international peace building.

A group of 25 college students from Iraq are in Montana, as part of a Young Leaders Exchange Program arranged by the U.S. State Department and the University of Montana.
Natalie Dawson, director of the Wilderness Institute

A group of 25 college students from Iraq are in Montana, as part of a Young Leaders Exchange Program arranged by the U.S. State Department and the University of Montana. The three-week tour is focused on international peace building through studies in environmental and cultural preservation.

Senator Jon Tester is ripping the new Senate health care bill; Senator Steve Daines says he needs more time to study it.

In western Montana, nearly 200 firefighters are battling the Lazier Creek 3 Fire, located south of Highway 2 and west of the Thompson River Road.

It’s hot outside, and as many as 3,000 people could be without water in a week due to a severe shortage on the Rocky Boy’s Reservation.

The KettleHouse Amphitheater sits along the bank of the Big Blackfoot River, just north of the new KettleHouse Brewing facility and the old lumber mill in Bonner, MT.
Josh Burnham

A new outdoor music venue is opening in Bonner, MT, just east of Missoula.

The KettleHouse Amphitheater, with its sleek integration of wood paneling and boulders, complements the scenic backdrop of the Blackfoot Valley. It’s located at the Bonner Mill Industrial Park, just north of the new KettleHouse Brewing facility and the old lumber mill along the banks of the Big Blackfoot River.

A sound check on the main festival stage at the Montana Folk Festival this afternoon
Josh Burnham

The Montana Folk Festival in Butte kicks off tonight. This year is its 10th anniversary, and it’s a significant boost to the Copper city’s economy.

Earlier today, staff at the Uptown Cafe were busy preparing for the expected dinner rush. Mary McAlexander, the manager said, “Business for us quadruples on this weekend from what it would normally be, so we love it.”

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