MTPR

Dan Wenk

Flickr user lance_mountain (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Identity of Victim in Grizzly Attack Released

A 63-year old man from Billings, Montana, has been identified as the victim of last week’s grizzly bear attack in Yellowstone. Around noon on Friday, August 7, Lance Crosby was found dead approximately .5 miles from the Elephant Back Loop Trail in a popular off-trail area in the Lake Village area of the park. Crosby was a long-term seasonal employee of Medcor, the company that operates three urgent care clinics in the park. He had worked and lived in Yellowstone for five seasons and was an experienced hiker. 

Grizzly Bear advocate Doug Peacock penned the letter asking President Obama to retain endangered species protections for Yellowstone-area grizzlies.
Eric Whitney

Yellowstone National Park's response to the death of Montana man while hiking in the park late last week is drawing criticism.

Yellowstone Seeking Grizzly Involved Montana Man's Death

Aug 8, 2015
Courtesy NPS

Preliminary results of the investigation into the recent death of a hiker in Yellowstone National Park show that the man was attacked by a grizzly bear. While the exact cause of death has not been determined, investigators have identified what appear to be defensive wounds on the victim’s forearms.

National Park Service

Dan Wenk, Superintendent of Yellowstone National Park, walks in the footsteps of 142 years of leadership in the world's oldest national park. His decisions affect not only the park, but its neighboring landowners and businesses. "You don't answer the questions in national parks by building facilities. Oftentimes, it's (best) to leave the area alone. Try to give people a great, broad experience of what's in a national park, but don't commercialize that experience."

Montana Wildlife Commissioners have voted unanimously to enact more aggressive hunting and trapping rules for the gray wolf. It’s part of an effort to reduce the predator’s population, which is still higher than state biologists want. This despite recent hunting seasons put in place after wolves were taken off the endangered species list a couple of years ago.

The new rules extend the hunting season, allow more wolves to be taken by individuals and allow the use of electronic calls.

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