MTPR

butterflies

'Field Notes:' All About Skippers

Aug 13, 2018
Golden-banded skipper.
Andrew Cannizzaro (CC-BY-2)

Out on a run on a spring day only a stone’s throw from the Flathead River on the watery outskirts of the town of Hungry Horse, I have stopped for a moment and listen to the river. With its rustling it seems to applaud my efforts. And as I go back and forth between stretching and sauntering, my glance roves over the landscape. A sudden fluttering at my feet catches my eye. Alerted to something, now not my legs but my curious eyes give chase and follow a meandering path through the air. Is it a leaf caught in the breeze? For a moment the leafiness lingers rocking back and forth, and I know it’s not a leaf, but a butterfly. Or is it?

(L) Monarch butterly, (R) viceroy butterfly. Can you see the differences?
Piccolo Namek, Derek Ramsey (GFDL 1.2)

Can you tell the difference between a monarch and a viceroy butterfly? Do you know what a western two-tailed swallowtail is? Tune in to "Pea Green Boat" on Wednesday, March 30 at 4:00 p.m. to learn more about these butterflies of western Montana with Glenn Marangelo from the Missoula Butterfly House & Insectarium.

Glenn Marangelo from the Missoula Insectarium will glide in to teach us about winter butterflies; that is, butterflies that spend the winter in Montana as adults.
Sam Manno

Glenn Marangelo from the Missoula Insectarium will glide in to teach us about winter butterflies; that is, butterflies that spend the winter in Montana as adults. How do they survive? What do they do to pass the time? Tune in to "Pea Green Boat" at 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 24 to find out.

A blue death-feigning beetle, living up to its name.
Josh Burnham

Today on "Pea Green Boat" Annie had special guests from  the Missoula Insectarium. Glenn Marangelo joined the show to talk about insects, and he brought some six-legged friends with him.

Sunlight, Sodium, & Spiders: The Life Of A Montana Butterfly

Jul 29, 2015
Spring azure butterfly.
Elena Gaillard (CC-BY-2)

A cluster of male butterflies called "blues" are sipping minerals from a damp, sandy patch at river’s edge. Each of the nickel-sized insects probes the sand grains with a proboscis, a tongue of sorts that’s more like a drinking straw. Then, something strange interrupts the peaceful scene. A butterfly keels over.

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