Montana Public Radio

Rodney Garcia

Sorry, Not Sorry; Senate Race Grows; Green Party Mystery

Feb 21, 2020

A Billings legislator's apology rings hollow. A new TV ad in the governor's race looks familiar. The U.S. Senate race has two more candidates. Census officials aren't happy about a Republican mailer. And the mystery deepens over who's sponsoring a 3rd party ballot petition.

Listen now on Campaign Beat.

Listen now on Campaign Beat: A state legislator stands by his calls for violence against 'socialists.' Montana's two senators split their votes on impeachment. Democrats running for governor are down to two candidates. The AG race has a new twist. And did Barack Obama urge Gov. Bullock to change his mind about a Senate run?


Montana Republican leaders are asking their colleague to step down from his state House seat after he made “inflammatory and deeply disturbing comments” at a party event last weekend. But the Billings lawmaker says he won’t resign.

Another Republican joins the 2020 race for governor. Republicans may be open to borrowing money for infrastructure projects — with a catch. A proposal for the state to buy a coal-fired power plant gets a rocky reception. Why passing new taxes could get harder. And a new poll shows the power of independent voters in Montana. Learn more now on "Capitol Talk" with Sally Mauk, Rob Saldin and Corin Cates-Carney.

Power plant at Colstrip, MT.
Beth Saboe / MontanaPBS

Lawmakers in Helena are starting to debate whether the state could borrow up to $500 million to buy the coal-fired power plant in Colstrip

The future of the plant is up in the air. The West Coast consumers who Colstrip sends most of its power to are pushing away from coal-powered electricity due to climate change concerns. Coal power is also becoming more expensive relative to electricity generated by natural gas and renewables.

Five To Follow: Week Of Jan. 21 At The Montana Legislature

Jan 18, 2019
Colstrip power plant.
John Adams / Montana Free Press

HELENA — Youth suicide, honoring an officer, coal plants, switchblades, and plastic straws: lawmakers have a lot to discuss during Week 3 of the legislative session. Here are a handful of topics to follow.