MTPR

Wild and Scenic Rivers Act

The Flathead National Forest is now taking comments on how it should manage the three forks of the Flathead River.
U.S. Forest Service

The last of this summer’s six public meetings on the management plan for the future of the Flathead River happens Wednesday in Kalispell.

Hosted by the Flathead National Forest and Glacier National Park, it will focus on recreation monitoring and scenery, two of the river’s outstanding remarkable values protected under its Wild and Scenic River designation.

Nicky Ouellet

There’s a band of rock that starts on one bank of the Middle Fork of the Flathead River west of Essex. It drops down underneath the current and rises up on the other side. Colter Pence says this is her favorite stretch of the Wild and Scenic River.

View Of The North Fork of The Flathead River Near Ford Cabin.
Flathead National Forest

The Flathead National Forest and Glacier National Park are continuing to seek public input on a new comprehensive river management plan for the three forks of the Flathead River. 

A total of 219 miles of the Flathead are designated under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. The Act was intended to safeguard the special character of certain U.S. rivers. As part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System, the Flathead is subject to federal planning to preserve and protect its outstanding natural value, including the various wildlife that call the river home.

Rafters on the Middle Fork of the Flathead River.
Glacier National Park (PD)

The Flathead National Forest and Glacier National Park are preparing a new comprehensive management plan for the three forks of the Flathead River, and they want the public’s input. That’s according to an announcement today from the U.S. Forest Service.